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Mammalthon 2: Snow Leopard (Uncia uncia)
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Number 0148 Here’s the first of several mammals requested by my dad for this second 24-Hour Mammal Marathon. A nice start, this furry and beautiful animal, don’t you think? Snow leopards live in the mountains of central Asia and are very endangered. They’re hunted for their coats, used in traditional Asian medicines, and killed when they prey on livestock. Then there’s the ubiquitous habitat...

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Mammals of New Mexico Week: Jaguar (Panthera onca)
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The 24-Hour Mammalthon slots are filling up! Reserve yours now—the Mammalthon is this Saturday! Look over to the right to find out more. Number 0144 We’re looking at New Mexico’s mammals to get ready for this weekend’s mammalthon, which benefits The Wildlife Center in northern New Mexico, a wonderful wildlife hospital. Today, let’s talk about a mammal The Wildlife Center has not yet treated....

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Binturong (Arctictis binturong)
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Get ready for the second-ever Daily Mammal 24-Hour Mammal Marathon! Number 0136 Ivan T. Sanderson calls this guy “one of the most astonishing and paradoxical animals known” in Living Mammals. I had never heard of them until Claire e-mailed me to request one, and I’m so glad she did. They’re related to sloths and to civets, and like sloths, they seem to grow algae...

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Striped Mammal Week: Banded Mongoose (Mungos mungo)
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Coming soon: the second Daily Mammal 24-Hour Mammalthon! Prepare yourself! Number 0135 As Striped Mammal Week draws to a close, we encounter the banded mongoose of Africa. Banded mongooses live in most every type of ecosystem except for deserts. They’re little nomads, staying in any given den (which they recycle from termite nests) for only a few days at a time, or maybe a...

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Striped Mammal Week: Aardwolf (Proteles cristata)
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Before long, it will be time for another 24-Hour Mammal Marathon! Number 0134 The aardwolf is in the hyena family, and you can see the resemblance. Unlike their hyena cousins, however, aardwolves are insectivores, eating mainly termites along with the larvae of other insects. They keep their dens in underground burrows throughout Africa, often moving into homes that aardvarks have abandoned. They’re sometimes killed...

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Cape Hunting Dog (Lycaon pictus)
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Number 0122 This African wild dog with big round ears and thin, mottled fur uses abandoned aardvark holes as dens to bear its pups. It lives in packs of around 10 dogs. Cape hunting dogs have what Walker’s Mammals of the World calls “a largely undeserved reputation as an indiscriminate killer of livestock and valued game animals,” which means, of course, that people have...

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Sand Cat (Felis margarita)
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Number 0109 Apologies for the delay in getting this cat up. I was on a business trip this week and wasn’t able to post. The sand cat is a mysterious, solitary, nocturnal creature that lives in the Sahara, on the Arabian peninsula, and in central Asia. They are quite well adapted to their desert homes, with large outer ears to protect from blowing sand,...

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Teledu (Indonesian Stink Badger) (Mydaus javanensis)
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Number 0108 This teledu is for Chris and for Croydon. Teledus are related to badgers and to skunks. This one lives in Sumatra and Java. Among other things, it eats earthworms. Its generic name means wet, damp, and moldy substance, which brings me to the most special thing about the stink badger: it shoots a green liquid from its anal glands. It smells so...

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Back Orders: Steller Sea Lion (Eumetopias jubatus)
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Number 0107 My father-in-law, Steve, requested a sea lion, and I selected the Steller for him. These big sea lions (males get to about 11 feet long and weigh around 2,500 pounds) live in the northern Pacific Rim from Japan up and around to Alaska and down to northern California. They are divided into two populations, western and eastern, with the eastern stock comprising,...

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Back Orders: Arctic Fox (Alopex lagopus)
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Number 0106 The Arctic fox is Nicola’s favorite mammal, so this one is for her. My own favorite thing about the Arctic fox is that it is Iceland’s only native land mammal; all the other terrestrial mammals there were brought by humans. Arctic foxes’ coats are generally white in the winter and a lovely gray or gray-and-white in the summer, although this also seems...

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Back Orders: Sea Otter (Enhydra lutris)
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Number 0103 Here is a funny fellow for Joanna. Sea otters, which live in the coastal waters of the Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea, have the thickest fur of any mammal. That’s because unlike other aquatic mammals, sea otters don’t have blubber and rely on their fur to insulate them. They spend most of their time on their backs. As Ivan T. Sanderson says,...

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Back Orders: Fossa (Cryptoprocta forex)
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Number 0102 Jennifer’s stuck on a bus, so I’m posting this one for her. No, really, she is. This one was requested by Russell. This little cat-like carnivore is endemic to Madagascar. It spends most of its time sleeping, which is why Jennifer didn’t draw its amazing brown eyes. Now she wishes she had. But I like this little tyke just the way she...

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Back Orders: Arctic Wolf (Canis lupus arctos)
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The arctic wolf, which Nancy requested, is a subspecies of the gray wolf. It’s a little smaller with a shorter nose and ears and a white coat year-round. The arctic wolf is very isolated in the northernmost parts of North America and in Greenland, and the World Wildlife Foundation tells me that it’s the only wolf subspecies that isn’t threatened, which is good news...

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Back Orders: Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus)
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Number 0100 My brother-in-law Stephen is a runner. I think that’s why he requested a cheetah. In a sprinting contest, though, Stephen would stand no chance: the fastest human sprinters hit about 20 miles per hour, while the cheetah goes at about 65–70. The cheetah, however, cannot go nearly as fast as the peregrine falcon, which is the fastest animal on earth. Diving in...

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Back Orders: Fennec Fox (Vulpes zerda)
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This fennec fox is for Kelsey, who used to be an absurdly adorable and entertaining young boy, but is now unaccountably a suave and self-possessed teenager. The fennec is his favorite animal at the zoo. I drew one a while back, but I never did like my drawing, so I’m glad I got the chance to redo...

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24 Hours: Kinkajou
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24 Hours: Kinkajou

Dec 23, 2007 by

Number 0095 This is another case where the donor asked me to choose a mammal. For my tia Laura, I chose the kinkajou, a panda/raccoon relative. I know I was supposed to cut down on research and commentary, but I remember reading a book when I was a kid about a family that had a pet kinkajou (among other exotic pets). I think it...

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24 Hours: Dog (Canis lupus familiaris)
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Okay, time to get serious. I’m not going to look up Latin names anymore, and I’m going to try to keep my commentary as brief as possible. I’m too far behind, and I really have to meet this goal: 24 mammals, come what may! This black standard poodle is for Doris McDonald, aka the best-ever tooth puller! —————- Now playing: The Rolling Stones –...

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24 Hours: Brown Bear (Ursus arctos)
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You may recall from the grizzly I drew a while back that it’s a subtype of this beautiful species, the brown bear. They’re just so big and heavy and shaggy. I really like them. This one, who has just caught a salmon for dinner, is for Kari. Well, it looks like I’m two mammals behind! I need to speed up...

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24 Hours: Domesticated Ferret (Mustela putorius furo)
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Number 0080 Here’s a furry fellow for Ame in Houston. A healthy domestic ferret will sleep up to 20 hours a day. Think of all the mammals it could draw in that time if it wasn’t so lazy! Also, although I’d really like to look up putorius right now, since both the domestic ferret and the eastern spotted skunk have it in their names,...

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24 Hours: Gray Wolf (Canis lupus)
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Number 0079 Here’s a gray wolf for Jay. The gray wolf is the largest of the canines. It was once prevalent throughout the world; now it’s restricted mainly to northern North America, Asia, and Europe, with a few small populations surviving in western...

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24 Hours: Eastern Spotted Skunk (Spilogale putorius)
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Number 0078 Let’s kick off the mammal extravaganza with a flourish! Kyle requested this eastern spotted skunk. They actually do handstands like this, waving their tails about threateningly, as a warning when they’re about to spray! Ivan T. Sanderson, in How to Know the American Mammals, says that “like all skunks,” the eastern spotted skunks make “delightful, friendly, intelligent pets.” I think I would...

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Eurasian Badger (Meles meles)
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Number 0073 This species of badger lives in Europe and Asia, and is highly popular in England. In a way, it’s the British version of the American raccoon, getting into people’s gardens and trash cans and whatnot (rubbish bins, I think they’d call them), only the badger seems to be much more beloved than the raccoon. People actually try to attract them to their...

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Coyote (Canis latrans)
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Number 0065 This coyote is for Maleta. Her favorite animal, like mine, is the dog, the plain old domestic dog, but I can’t draw my favorite in the first few months of a 14-year project! So Maleta requested a coyote, which is also the mascot of the high school in Tatum, where she lives. Coyotes are also one of my favorites. At my parents’...

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Least Weasel (Mustela nivalis)
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Number 0064 The wonderful Doris McDonald of Tatum, New Mexico, requested (some time ago) a weasel. I picked this one, the least weasel, which is the smallest of the weasel species. How to Know the American Mammals says that the least weasel is small and nimble enough to fit through a hole the size of a “quarter,” but it puts quarter in quotation marks...

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Pallas Cat (Felis manul)
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Number 0063 I ran across an intense pair of big yellow eyes in a mammal field guide and introduced myself to the Pallas cat, also known as the manul. Pallas cats are really no bigger than domesticated house cats. They live in the steppes of central Asia, especially in Mongolia, and have long silver-yellow fur and funny little ears. They haven’t been studied to...

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American Black Bear (Ursus americanus)
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Number 0062 The mammals are back! After a hiatus in which I bought a house, moved into it, and wrote a novel, I have returned to mammalography with a renewed commitment to reaching my goal. Thank you for your support, and please stay tuned for an announcement later this week about a special Daily Mammal event. This fellow here is a black bear. They...

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Bush Dog (Speothos venaticus)
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Number 0057 This canid lives in South America. He looks, to me, like a cross between a corgi and a kinkajou. But don’t worry, he isn’t! Every continent except Australia and Antarctica has native wild dogs. (Dingos aren’t native to Australia but were introduced. As far as I know, no wild dogs have been introduced to Antarctica...

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Nocturnal Week: Fennec Fox (Vulpes zerda)
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Number 0045 The fennec fox is one of my favorite mammals; I wish I had done him justice. Someday when I have time for an extra mammal, I’m going to redraw this guy. If you’re not familiar with fennecs, check out some photographs (these are of someone’s pet fennec fox, and are quite nice). They are the smallest canid, topping out at around 3...

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