Navigation Menu+
Ethiopian Wolf (Canis simensis)
Read more

Number 0290 Why not stay in Ethiopia’s mountains a while? The Ethiopian wolves live there, too—all 500 of them. Like the gelada monkeys, these wolves are being killed off by climate change as less and less habitat is available to them and more and more people start farming higher and higher in the mountains. Perhaps I haven’t stressed this enough: we are killing off...

Read more
Lions!
Read more

Lions!

Aug 19, 2009 by

Did you notice the Daily Mammal has been on a sort of sabbatical? That was for very good reason: my family has expanded! And in honor of that, today we have not one but THREE lion drawings—by me, my son Theo (age 13), and my daughter Coco (age 10). Can you believe Theo has never drawn with this particular technique? And Coco’s baby lion...

Read more
Gray Fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus)
Read more

Number 0284 The gray fox lives in the southern half of North America, from the southmost edge of Canada down to Colombia and Venezuela, avoiding parts of the Rocky Mountains and the Great Plains. They prefer foresty areas, mostly, or brushy desert areas. They love to eat cottontails, mice, voles, shrews, and birds, but they also eat a good deal of fruit and vegetables....

Read more
Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus)
Read more

Number 0270 The Iberian lynx is the most endangered cat species in the world. In fact, it’s in imminent danger of being the first cat to become extinct since the saber-toothed tiger. While the cats once lived in both Spain and Portugal, there’s no sign of them in Portugal anymore, and they’re confined to only two small regions in Spain now. Fewer than 150...

Read more
Mammals of Alaska Week: Fisher (Martes pennanti)
Read more

Number 0269 Fishers live only in North America, and currently only in northern North America, from Alaska and Canada down to the Sierra Nevadas and the Appalachians. At one time, they ranged as far south as Tennessee and North Carolina, but they’ve disappeared from much of their historic range because of excessive trapping and habitat loss from logging. Fishers don’t get their name because...

Read more
Black-backed Jackal (Canis mesomelas)
Read more

Number 0263 Hello, mammals, and thanks for your patience through the long hiatus I seem to have taken from drawing and posting! We’re back in the swing of things now with this black-backed jackal, who lives in two separate parts of Africa, one in the east and one in the south. There is some controversy about who’s a jackal and who isn’t, but my...

Read more
Bat-eared Fox (Otocyon megalotis)
Read more

Number 0259 Well, that’s an apt name! This fox (whose scientific name translates into something like ear-dog big-ear), lives in two separate areas of Africa that are about 1,000 km (621 miles) apart. One is in the eastern part of the continent, ranging from Ethiopia and southern Sudan to Tanzania, and one is in the south, from southern Angola to South Africa. Depending on...

Read more
Zorilla (Ictonyx striatus)
Read more

Number 0249 The animal above looks like a skunk, but he isn’t. His name is a dimunitive form of the word zorro, Spanish for fox, but he’s not Spanish or a fox. Like his skunk doppelgangers, he’s in the polecat family, and he lives throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Besides their striking good looks, zorillas and skunks share something else: a nasty compulsion to spray foul-smelling...

Read more
Coffee Achievers Days: Common Palm Civet (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus)
Read more

Beginning March 16: the Daily Mammal Book Club!   Number 0242 Here is a common palm civet, which is also called an Asian palm civet or a toddy-cat. That second name comes from the civet’s supposed habit of drinking the palm wine, or toddy, that people had left in cups to ferment, or possibly eating or drinking naturally fermented palm fruits. I wonder if...

Read more
Darwin Days: American Mink (Neovison vison or Mustela vison)
Read more

Number 0239 Welcome, readers of the Blog for Darwin blog carnival! (A blog carnival is a collection of posts from different blogs but on the same topic. I’m participating in one that compiles posts related to Darwin today through the 15th. Click the link above to read some of the other bloggers’ posts.) At the Daily Mammal, we’re celebrating Charles Darwin’s 200th birthday (today!...

Read more
Darwin Days: Lion (Panthera leo)
Read more

Number 0238 It’s quite fashionable to equate the theory of evolution with Charles Darwin himself. Science magazines and books sell with covers blaring “Darwin Was Wrong,” “Was Darwin Wrong?,” and “What Darwin Got Wrong.” Meanwhile, intelligent-design and creationism proponents attack “Darwinism,” and the New York Times publishes “Darwinism Must Die So That Evolution May Live” and “Let’s Get Rid of Darwinism.” By creating an...

Read more
Hibernators Week: Asiatic Black Bear (Ursus thibetanus)
Read more

Number 0231 Today is the last day of Hibernators Week at the Daily Mammal, so I’d like to introduce you to a bear, that classic hibernator. This particular bear is an Asiatic black bear. It lives in forests in several countries in southern Asia, including China, Japan, Iran, and Pakistan, among others. In the northern parts of its range, it hibernates, filling up on...

Read more
Hibernators Week: Raccoon Dog (Tanuki) (Nyctereutes procyonoides)
Read more

Number 0224 Guess what! The raccoon dog is not endangered. In fact, in some parts of its range, it is considered a nuisance! How exciting for us, don’t you think? The raccoon dog is in the canid family, although it does resemble a raccoon, especially facially. It originally lived from Siberia to Vietnam, as well as throughout Japan, but it was introduced into Russia...

Read more
Crab-eating Raccoon (Procyon cancrivorous)
Read more

Number 0219 Crab-eating raccoons eat not just crabs, but other crustaceans and plenty of fruit, too: probably just about anything they can get their paws on, really. They live in Central and South America, from Costa Rica to Argentina, and on some Caribbean islands. I think they kind of look like a summertime version of our North American common raccoons, and they are closely...

Read more
Greater Grisón (Galictis vittata)
Read more

Number 0218 This relative of the skunks, badgers, weasels, and ferrets lives in Central and South America. It makes its home in burrows when it’s not zipping around, spiritedly hunting birds, small mammals, and invertebrates, pausing occasionally for a palate-cleansing piece of fruit. Walker’s Mammals of the World says, “Young grisóns tame readily and make affectionate pets,” but I feel no urge to test...

Read more
Serval (Felis serval)
Read more

  Number 0215 Hello, mammals! Meet the serval, a smallish African wild cat. But not all of it is smallish; in fact, proportionally, the serval has the longest legs and the biggest ears of all the cats. (You can’t see the legs here, obviously, but check out the full-body photographs on ARKive. Servals look like they’re wearing the wrong heads.) They remind me of...

Read more
Mammals of Hawaii Week: Small Asian Mongoose (Herpestes javanicus)
Read more

Number 0209 Let’s continue our celebration of President-Elect Obama’s childhood home, shall we? Yesterday I mentioned that today we’d meet the only land mammal native to Hawaii (or as native as a mammal can be to Hawaii, meaning, I suppose, that it was already there when people arrived). Well, this mongoose isn’t it. Hawaii’s only indigenous land mammal is the Hawaiian hoary bat, a...

Read more
Chinese Ferret Badger (Melogale moschata)
Read more

Number 0196 The smallest member of the badger family, the Chinese ferret badger lives not only in China but in Assam, in northeastern India, as well. They live in burrows and come out in the evenings, going about their business into the night. The Chinese ferret badger occasionally eats fruit, but it especially loves small rodents, amphibians, and insects and other invertebrates. In some...

Read more
Chinese Mountain Cat (Felis bieti)
Read more

Number 0195 The Chinese mountain cat is also called the Chinese desert cat, but it’s not really known to live in the desert. It prefers to roam around mountain meadows, where it eats rodents like pikas and voles and mole-rats, along with the occasional pheasant for variety’s sake. It seems to use its ears when it hunts, listening for the sound of mole-rats burrowing...

Read more
Mammals of Iraq: Golden Jackal (Canis aureus)
Read more

Number 0193 Golden jackals live not only in Iraq, but throughout northern Africa, Asia, and up into southern Europe. They mate for life, living in tight little family packs. They have one litter a year, and each time, a couple of their offspring stay on with their parents to help raise the next litter. These big brothers and sisters are called “helpers” and are...

Read more
Mammals of Iraq: Smooth-coated Otter (Lutrogale perspicillata)
Read more

  Number 0186 To celebrate my boss Ramona’s successful trip to the Kurdish region of northern Iraq, as well as because we’re still at war there, I’m going to be spotlighting some of the mammals of Iraq this week. These two fine fellows are smooth-coated otters, who live in Iraq’s Mesopotamian marshlands, as well as in other parts of Asia. The otters have a...

Read more
Mountain Lion (Felis concolor)
Read more

  Number 0179 I want to tell you about these amazing old books I recently acquired. A couple of weeks ago, my mom and I went to our local “indoor flea market.” I happened across this old hardbound green book called Wonders of Animal Life, volume four. It’s one of those great old 1920s or 1930s books with the copperplate photo captions and tinted...

Read more
Mammalthon 2: White-Nosed Coati (Nasua narica)
Read more

Number 0166 My dad asked me to draw him a coatimundi. It turns out that the coatimundi, once thought to be a separate species, is actually a male coati. Coatimundi, in a Central American Indian language I can’t pin down for certain, means “lone coati” or “solitary coati,” and adult male coatis are a lonesome bunch, roaming about alone while the females form groups....

Read more
Mammalthon 2: Kit Fox (Vulpes macrotis)
Read more

Number 0162 My uncle Jay, a great uncle in more than one way, requested a baby kit fox. This was at first confusing to research because baby foxes are sometimes called kits no matter the particular species (when they’re not being called pups or cubs). But here in fact is a kit fox cub. They live in the Chihuahuan desert (I used to live...

Read more
Mammalthon 2: Tiger (Panthera tigris)
Read more

If you’re still sticking around, thanks for sticking around! I have a lot of mammals left to draw, and I will try to draw them all this week. We raised more than $1,000 for the Wildlife Center, which is very exciting and will help them a lot. Here’s a tiger for my cousin...

Read more
Mammalthon 2: Harbor Seal (Phoca vitulina)
Read more

Here are two harbor seals that will be waiting for Heather when she wakes up because I like her twice as much! Don’t worry, there is almost no chance that they will fall victim to the Steller sea lion’s intrapinnipedal appetites. —————- Now playing: Nas – The World Is Yours via...

Read more
Mammalthon 2: Steller Sea Lion (Eumetopias jubatus)
Read more

Kate, the mother of my dear friend Sarah (who should be graduating with her MFA any day now—congratulations, Sarah!), requested a Steller sea lion. The largest of all sea lions, Steller sea lions live along the northern Pacific rim. They’re carnivorous, and according to National Geographic’s website, they have been known to eat smaller seals. I also learned from that page that in the...

Read more