Navigation Menu+
Mammal Olympiad: Fencing: Mrs. Gray’s Lechwe (Kobus megaceros)
Read more

Number 0418 Today’s Mammalympian is a fencer. Well, sort of. In human fencing, the object is to touch your opponent with your blade; your opponent uses his or her blade to keep you from doing that, while also trying to touch you. Some mammals carry their “blades” on their heads in the form of horns or antlers, and they’re more likely to attempt to...

Read more
Mammal Olympiad: Long Jump: Merriam’s Kangaroo Rat (Dipodomys merriami)
Read more

Number 0417 As the humans compete in the London Olympics, the other mammals have an Olympiad of their own here at the Daily Mammal! Today’s mammalympian is an amazing long jumper, Merriam’s kangaroo rat, which lives throughout the southwestern United States and in Mexico. It’s nocturnal and solitary and eats mostly seeds, including the seeds of creosote, mesquite, and ocotillo. This little rodent bounces...

Read more
Mammal Olympiad: Gymnastics: Buff-cheeked Gibbon (Nomascus gabriellae)
Read more

Number 0416 While the human Olympics continue in London, the Mammal Olympiad continues here on the Daily Mammal! Today, we have a gymnast. As with human gymnastics, mammal gymnastics is difficult to judge in that there’s no fastest, no deepest, no highest. The best gymnast is the one who performs the most skillfully, gracefully, powerfully, and beautifully. In searching for the creature who might...

Read more
Mammal Olympiad: High Jump: Klipspringer (Oreotragus oreotragus)
Read more

The Mammal Olympiad continues! We’re looking at the best athletes in the world, and today’s event is the high jump. The champion is the klipspringer, an African antelope whose name means “rock jumper” in Dutch. Klipspringers can jump 25 feet in the air, and they’re less than two feet tall at the shoulder. The human high jump record, on the other hand, is only...

Read more
Mammal Olympiad: Diving: Sperm Whale (Physeter catodon)
Read more

Number 0415 Good evening, mammals, and welcome back to the Mammal Olympiad! While the humans are deciding who the best human athletes are, we’re looking at some other mammals that are even better athletes than we humans. Today’s event is diving. While human divers are judged on the technical perfection of the dive itself, we’re picking our mammalian champ on depth and and time,...

Read more
Mammal Olympiad: Marathon: Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana)
Read more

The human Olympics start tonight on NBC, and the mammal Olympics start tonight here on the Daily Mammal! We’ll be looking at a few of the best mammalian athletes in the world. The first event is the marathon. Now, humans are pretty good at marathons. In fact, long-distance running is humans’ best sport. Slate had an article a couple of months ago whose subtitle...

Read more
Random Week: Red-handed Howler Monkey (Alouatta belzebul)
Read more

Number 0414 Here’s our last randomly picked mammal for now: tomorrow the Mammal Olympiad starts! Let’s let this red-handed howler monkey see us out of Random Week. The red-handed howler lives in Brazil. Among howler monkeys, it isn’t very well studied, by which I mean that humans haven’t studied it very well, not that it isn’t learned or educated. It eats leaves (because it’s...

Read more
Random Week: African Sheath-tailed Bat (Coleura afra)
Read more

Number 0413 Here is a bat, randomly chosen by random.org from all the mammals I haven’t drawn, that lives in Africa, mostly in the eastern part of the continent, but in some parts of the western side, too. A few years ago, a population of these bats was found in Madagascar, but they may turn out to be a different species. Like many bat...

Read more
Random Week: Rakali (Hydromys chrysogaster)
Read more

Number 0412 Today’s lottery winner, picked by random.org, is the water rat or rakali, an interesting rodent from Australia. The rakali is one of Australia’s two amphibious mammals, the other being the platypus, and in fact, people often think they’re watching a platypus when they’re really looking at a rakali. Both animals live in burrows dug into the banks of rivers, lakes, irrigation ditches,...

Read more
Random Week: Mongoose Lemur (Eulemur mongoz)
Read more

Number 0411 This week, random.org is picking our mammals, and the random-number generator made me very happy this morning. Instead of the statistically likely rodent, we get a lemur! Hello, mongoose lemur. We can tell that this one is a male because his cheeks and beard are red; females are plain gray and white. The mongoose lemur is a little unusual among lemurs for...

Read more
Indochinese Flying Squirrel (Hylopetes phayrei)
Read more

Number 0410 I let random.org pick the mammal today, and a little flying squirrel turned up (a rodent, of course!). This guy lives in China, Vietnam, Thailand, and Myanmar (Burma). I can’t find much information about it, in my books or online, and to find most of my reference photos, I had to search for the Thai name, which seems to be กระรอกบินเล็กแก้มขาว. The...

Read more
Murines Five Ways
Read more

Murines Five Ways

Jul 20, 2012 by

Numbers 405, 406, 407, 408, and 409 Here are three rats and two mice from the Old World rats and mice subfamily of the rodent order. Clockwise from the top right, may I introduce Tokudaia muenninki, Muennink’s spiny rat or the Okinawan spiny rat; Apodemus sylvaticus, the wood mouse or long-tailed field mouse; Arvicanthis niloticus, the African grass rat; Apomys datae, the Luzon montane...

Read more
Corsac Fox (Vulpes corsac)
Read more

Number 0404 The corsac fox is a nomadic, nocturnal, social resident of the steppes and semi-deserts of central Asia, from Russia and other former Soviet states to Mongolia and China and down to Afghanistan and Iran. It lives in the abandoned burrows of other animals, and it eats rodents, pikas, birds, insects, and plants. Walker’s Mammal’s of the World says that “it runs with...

Read more
Agile Antechinus (Antechinus agilis)
Read more

Number 0403 This fellow is one of a group of species called broad-footed marsupial mice. They’re small, carnivorous marsupials native to Australia. I drew this sometime last year, I think, and I don’t know where I found this guy because the species is not in any of my books or in my mammal species database. It was first described in 1998, having previously been...

Read more
Two Indian Bats (Megaderma lyra and Pteropus giganteus)
Read more

Numbers 401 and 402 Here are two bats, the last mammals we’ll visit in our mini-trip to India. On the left is the Indian false vampire bat, Megaderma lyra, also known as the greater false vampire bat, and on the right is his friend (only not really) the Indian flying fox, Pteropus giganteus. False vampire bats have that name because in the past, people...

Read more
Indian Pangolin (Manis crassicaudata)
Read more

Number 0400 The Indian pangolin, which is also called the thick-tailed pangolin, is native to India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and Bangladesh. It is myrmecophagous, which means it eats ants and termites. Remember the secret word feature on Pee-wee’s Playhouse? Let’s all scream real loud today whenever someone says “myrmecophagous”! The pangolin needs a long tongue to root around in anthills and termite mounds, and...

Read more
Indian Grey Mongoose (Herpestes edwardsii)
Read more

Number 0399 Mammals, my mammals, it has been so very long since I have seen you, or at least since you have seen me. Life is hard, and also this website was hacked. Many months (or perhaps more than a year: I don’t dare actually look) have passed, and now I have a new web host (Brownrice Internet, highly recommended), a website that will...

Read more
My pets (Minnie)
Read more

My pets (Minnie)

Apr 5, 2012 by

By Coco Here is my 3rd post about my pets! Her name is Minnie! Here is some facts about her! Hope you enjoy them!! Minnie is My best friend!! She comforts me when I’m feeling down, she kisses me when I need some loving! She is so comforting! Everything is perfect about her! Well not everything… She’s not very good at getting a walk....

Read more
My pets (Jojo)
Read more

My pets (Jojo)

Mar 30, 2012 by

By Coco This is my next post for the section My pets. And my next animal’s name is Jojo. Here is some information about him. Jojo, hmm where do we start with Jojo!!? Jojo is a whole new world of dogs! He isn’t a regular dog. I wouldn’t say he’s weird, but I would say he is special. He doesn’t know how to play!...

Read more
My pets  (Marty)
Read more

My pets (Marty)

Mar 28, 2012 by

By Coco Hello everybody!!! For a few days I’m going to be drawing and writing about my pets. Here is the first one. His name is Marty! Marty is a very good boy… That is if he likes you.:D  When I first met him he barked and growled at me and he just thought I was his enemy!! And he made me think that...

Read more
Rat (Rattus norvegicus)
Read more

By Coco Hello everybody!!! Today I drew a rat! Here is some information about them. I hope you enjoy! If you have rats in your house they are either pets or pests right? Well in my case they are pets! And I know one thing for a fact!! People say they are disgusting, evil, little biters! Even if they have red eyes that does...

Read more
Lion (Panthera leo)
Read more

By Coco Hello everybody! Today I drew a male lion! Here are some interesting facts about them! -Male lions weigh 350-400 pounds!! -They are 3 ft tall from the shoulders down and they are 9 ft long including the tail. -In the wild they live for 10- 14 years but they could live for about 20 years! -They are capable of running 30 mph!...

Read more
Harvest mouse (Micromys minutus)
Read more

By Coco Here are some facts about the Harvest mouse. -Harvest mice live in tall grasses. -They make there nest out of the tall grasses around them. -There nests are about 4 inches in diameter. -An adult Harvest mouse weighs about 5-11 g. -They are about 1-3 inches tall, there tail is also 1-3 inches long. -They can live at the most 7 years...

Read more
Red Squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris)
Read more

by Coco Hi everyone, Here are some facts about Red Squirrels. I hope you enjoy them! -Red Squirrels are 8-9 inches tall. -Their tail is just about the same length reaching 8-9 inches! -What is the long tail used for? *Like lots of mammals it is used for balance. *It helps them steer while they are jumping from tree to tree. *It helps them...

Read more
Bearded seal (Erignathus barbatus)
Read more

By Coco Hi everyone, these are some facts about Bearded seals: -Bearded seals are greyish white with some brown. -If they are stuck under ice they will ram their head into the ice to make breathing holes. -Bearded seals lay on the edge of the ice looking downward into water so they can get away from a predator if one approaches. -Bearded seals are...

Read more
Eastern Quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus)
Read more

  By Coco Hi Daily Mammal readers, this is Coco, and I am now an official Daily Mammal contributor.!! Yay Coco!! Above is my FIRST mammal that I posted on my own. Let me tell you about it! What does Dasyurus mean? It means hairy tail. Quolls’ tails are 20-35cm long. They are about the size of a cat. They live on the ground in rocks...

Read more
What I’ve Been Doing
Read more

I’ve been wanting to write a post about the animals killed near Zanesville, Ohio, last week, but I’m not sure how to say everything I want to say. I did have the idea, though, to draw a tribute to the 49 unfortunate mammals who died, and I’ve been working on it the past several days, which is one reason why there hasn’t been a...

Read more
Golden-rumped Elephant Shrew (Rhynchocyon chrysopygus)
Read more

Number 0398 Here is the golden-rumped elephant shrew, which is also known as a golden-rumped sengi, or a yellow-rumped either one of those. It’s not actually related to the shrews, although it is related to the elephants, distantly. Some things I’ve learned about this fellow: 1. Translating its scientific name at the website of a zoology course at the University of Alberta, I see...

Read more