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Facebook Friends: Taiwan: Taiwan Tube-nosed Bat (Murina puta)
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Number 0441 Because I’m happy that the Daily Mammal Facebook page reached a double-digit number of likers last week, I’m drawing a mammal from every country one of those likers lives in. Representing Taiwan (and the fourth continent we’ve visited this week), home of one person who likes the Daily Mammal on Facebook, is the Taiwan tube-nosed bat. It lives only in Taiwan; in...

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Geoffroy Week: Geoffroy’s Tailless Bat (Anoura geoffroyi)
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Number 0431 We’ve been getting an unusual amount of rain here in New Mexico where I live, and my open window admits the sound of nocturnal frogs (or toads, maybe) calling from the standing water in the median outside. I’m drinking coffee from a cup hand-painted with an illustration of a bat visiting a flower (from Rainbow Gate in Santa Fe) (this is my...

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Geoffroy Week: Lesser Long-Eared Bat (Nyctophilus geoffroyi)
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Number 0425 Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire became the Chair of Mammals and Birds at the Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, the National Museum of Natural History in Paris, when he was only 21 years old. The museum was founded in 1793 by the Convention Nationale, the legislative body during the French Revolution. The Convention combined the Jardin du Roi—renamed the Jardin des Plantes—with a new menagerie...

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Random Week: African Sheath-tailed Bat (Coleura afra)
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Number 0413 Here is a bat, randomly chosen by random.org from all the mammals I haven’t drawn, that lives in Africa, mostly in the eastern part of the continent, but in some parts of the western side, too. A few years ago, a population of these bats was found in Madagascar, but they may turn out to be a different species. Like many bat...

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Two Indian Bats (Megaderma lyra and Pteropus giganteus)
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Numbers 401 and 402 Here are two bats, the last mammals we’ll visit in our mini-trip to India. On the left is the Indian false vampire bat, Megaderma lyra, also known as the greater false vampire bat, and on the right is his friend (only not really) the Indian flying fox, Pteropus giganteus. False vampire bats have that name because in the past, people...

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Mexican Free-tailed Bat (Tadarida brasiliensis)
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    Number 0395 The kids and I are reading a book called Hanging with Bats, which starts with a chapter about the Mexican free-tailed bats at Carlsbad Caverns here in New Mexico. We decided to draw the bats, and then my son Theo wrote a poem to post on the Daily Mammal. I think I may have mentioned, on this site, Thomas Nagel’s...

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Random Week: Inland Forest Bat (Vespadelus baverstocki)
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Number 0382 I had fun with the random rodents I drew the other day, so I’ve decided on a new theme week: Random Week! I put all the mammals I haven’t yet drawn in random.org’s list randomizer and for the next week-ish, I’ll be as surprised as you by what mammal I draw each day. (I only put in their genus and species names,...

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Mating Week: Gambian Epauletted Bat (Epomophorus gambianus)
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Number 0354 Last June, I drew the hammer-headed fruit bat, which is known for its lek mating system. The Gambian epauletted bat, today’s mammal, uses a similar lek system. In Courtship in the Animal Kingdom, Mark Jerome Walters explains leks: In some animals, however, males offer neither defense of the females nor any particular resource. There is no trade-off of riches, nor any guarantee...

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Wrinkle-faced Bat (Centurio senex)
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Number 0351 When I drew this guy, I was working on a Mammal Mating theme week, but that was several months ago, and now I can’t figure out what’s interesting about the wrinkle-faced bat’s mating habits, except that scientists speculate that the wrinkled face may be related to sexual selection. Only the males have big neck flaps, and they emit a musky odor from...

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World Cup: New Zealand Lesser Short-Tailed Bat (Mystacina tuberculata)
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Number 0334 We are continuing our look at the World Cup, and with this particular entry, we have some officiating errors, just as they have in the soccer tournament. You see, I usually draw my bats the way they are usually photographed: maybe hanging upside down, probably crouched on a tree or something. I like drawing portraits, and besides, there aren’t that many great...

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World Cup: The Rest of Group D
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Number 0325 Because I missed a few days and because if I don’t step on the gas the World Cup will end before the World Cup of Mammals does, tonight I’m posting the final three mammals of Group D (the other being Serbia’s marbled polecat from the other day). This first one is the topi (Damaliscus korrigum), an antelope representing Ghana. Ghana was the...

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World Cup: Greece’s Mediterranean Horseshoe Bat (Rhinolophus euryale)
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Number 0317 The Daily Mammal is celebrating the World Cup in the only way we can: by visiting with one mammal from each of the 32 participating countries. Today, let’s go to Greece! The Mediterranean horseshoe bat lives, yes, around the Mediterranean Sea, including in that land of olives and capers, Greece. The most pressing question about this bat is what’s up with that...

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Hammer-Headed Fruit Bat (Hypsignathus monstrosus)
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Number 0298 Meet the male hammer-headed fruit bat, whose head, says Ivan T. Sanderson in Living Mammals of the World, “is almost beyond belief. That of an adult male looks just like the cartoon of a horse when viewed from the side.” The female hammer-head doesn’t deserve the name at all: her dainty foxlike face is like those of most fruit bats, and very...

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Hibernators Week: Little Brown Bat (Myotis lucifugus)
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  Number 0221 This little brown bat, called the little brown bat—like our moon is called the moon—is quite a common fellow throughout most of North America. It eats a ton of insects every night—okay, not a ton, but at least a couple of grams, which is a lot for a little brown bat! It favors aquatically inclined insects, but will also munch moths...

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Common Tent-Making Bat (Uroderma bilobatum)
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  Number 0198 I drew a group of white tent bats in the very first Mammalthon, and I think learning about that species may have been the beginning of my current love for bats and for drawing them. Tressa saw that drawing and wanted a tent-making bat of her own, so these guys are for her. Thank you, Tressa, for giving these bats a...

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Mammals of Iraq: Egyptian Fruit Bat (Rousettus aegyptiacus)
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Number 0192 The Egyptian fruit bat (also called the Egyptian rousette) lives in the Middle East, Turkey, Cyprus, Pakistan, and India, and throughout Africa. It dines on fruits and nectars and helps to pollinate trees. Unfortunately, scientists confirmed last year that Egyptian fruit bats can carry the Ebola-like Marburg virus. Until then, the virus had never been found in animals other than primates, and...

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Great Stripe-Faced Bat (Vampyrodes caraccioli)
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Number 0184 I chose this bat completely at random from among all the mammals with species accounts in Mammalian Species. It’s a leaf-nosed Central and South American bat, and it’s frugivorous, another wonderful adjective from the world of biology: it eats fruit. The great stripe-faced bat enjoys a veritable tropical fruit salad, dining on papayas, figs, and bananas that it forages for in the...

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Mammalthon 2: White-Winged Vampire Bat (Diaemus youngi)
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Number 0149 Good thing I drew this so early, while it’s still light out, or we’d all be too scared to continue! It looks like this guy is in Joe’s bedroom, getting ready to bite while Joe sleeps peacefully. Luckily for Joe, however, white-winged vampire bats get the blood they drink mostly from birds. When the white-winged vampire bat spots a likely target—perhaps an...

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Daily Mammal Now: Indiana Bat (Myotis sodalis)
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The second Daily Mammal 24-Hour Mammal Extravaganza is coming April 19! Reserve your own special mammal now: just click the “donate” button in the right-hand navigation bar. Get an original, custom-made work of art and help animals at the same time! Number 0142 Today is the inaugural installment of a new periodic Daily Mammal spotlight feature, which I’m calling Daily Mammal Now. (I admit...

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North Carolina Week: Evening Bat (Nycticeius humeralis)
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Number 0112 All week on The Daily Mammal we’re looking at mammals of North Carolina. Evening bats, like this one here, live throughout the eastern United States in the lower elevations, and they’re particularly common in the southeastern states, like North Carolina. They’re similar to brown bats but much smaller—their bodies are only about four inches long and their wingspans are less than a...

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Large Flying Fox (Pteropus vampyrus)
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Number 0098 For Ted, a Large Flying Fox! These are really huge bats, with wingspans up to 6′! I had to draw two of them because I couldn’t decide whether to highlight its size in flight or its beautiful face. And it’s the last of the 24 mammals, which is actually making me a little sad! I have two questions for any bat experts...

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24 Hours: White Tent Bat (Ectophylla alba)
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Number 0082 I have to thank Elliot for introducing me to tent bats. I had never heard of them before. This particular tent-making bat species is also known as the Honduran white bat. It lives in Central America and is very small. Tent bats bite the ribs of big leaves to turn them into tents. Then they cuddle up under them to roost during...

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Common Vampire Bat (Desmodus rotundus)
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Number 0068 Do you know the vampire bat? If not, please allow me to make the introduction—I’d be delighted. Vampire bats live in South and Central America. They don’t just fly, like regular bats: they actually have their own unique gallop, and I highly recommend this short video of a vampire bat running on a treadmill. When it’s time to feed, they first approach...

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Nocturnal Week: Spotted Bat (Euderma maculatum)
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Number 0047 Bats are the classic nocturnal mammals, to the point of their nightmarish association with vampires and death. But they’re not so bad! I have a couple of books about building bat houses, and when Ted and I get our new place, we’re going to set one up. This particular bat, which has lovely black-and-white spots and gigantic, complicated ears, was a request...

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Hoary Bat (Lasiurus cinereus)
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Number 0010 Here is Ashley’s hoary bat! Ashley writes: My favorite mammal is a little guy called the Hoary Bat (Lasiurus cinereus), the most widely distributed bat in North America. They are even in Hawaii. They have a lovely hoar of...

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