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Facebook Friends: Israel: Buxton’s Jird (Meriones sacramenti)
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0456 In celebration of the fact that more than 100 people like the Daily Mammal on Facebook, I’ve been drawing mammals from the countries where those people live. Today’s is from Israel. This is Buxton’s jird, also known as the Negev jird, for it burrows in the sand of the Negev, a desert region in southern Israel. Some sources say that it’s the only...

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Facebook Friends: Netherlands: Trio of Voles (Microtus spp.)
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Numbers 0452, 0453, and 0454 I’m continuing my appreciation of everyone who has liked the Daily Mammal on Facebook with a look at mammals from another of their countries. If you’re on Facebook, liking the Daily Mammal is a good way to keep up with when I’m actually drawing mammals since we all know it ain’t daily. This time, we visit the Netherlands and...

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Facebook Friends: Ukraine: Sandy Mole Rat (Spalax arenarius)
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Number 0451 It’s been a while, mammals! But I’m back with more appreciation for the people from the now 17 countries who have liked the Daily Mammal on Facebook. Today’s mammal comes from a country that’s much in the news now: Ukraine, where citizens have been protesting, taking over government buildings, and becoming involved in violent clashes with security forces for more than two...

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Facebook Friends: Canada: Canadian Beaver (Castor canadensis)
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Number 0448 Today let’s continue visiting mammals that live near people who like the Daily Mammal on Facebook. This Canadian beaver represents, of course, Canada. It’s also (and probably more commonly) known as the North American beaver, but we’ll go with the Canadacentric name for our purposes here. The Canadian beaver is the largest rodent in North America, weighing up to 70 pounds. It...

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Facebook Friends: Turkey: Trio of Ground Squirrels (Spermophilus spp.)
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Numbers 0444, 0445, and 0446 To thank the more than 100 people who have liked the Daily Mammal Facebook page, I’m drawing mammals from each of the 19 (and counting) countries they live in. Today we have three species of ground squirrels who live in Turkey. All three rodents are in the genus Spermophilus, which means seed lover. Left to right, we have S. xanthoprymnus, the...

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Facebook Friends: Ghana: Ghana Mole Rat (Fukomys zechi)
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Number 0443 Let’s continue our look at the mammalian denizens of the countries where people who like the Daily Mammal Facebook page live! Did that sentence make sense? It’s getting tricky to phrase it in a slightly different way each day. We’re up to 19 countries to visit now, and this is the sixth one, as well as the fifth continent we’ve looked at....

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Facebook Friends: Trinidad and Tobago: Quartet of Trinbagonian Rodents
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Numbers 0437, 0438, 0439, and 0440 In honor of the more than 100 people who like the Daily Mammal Facebook page, I’m drawing a mammal (or a handful) from each of their homelands. So far, we’ve met mammals from the United States and Greece, and today we’re celebrating some mammalian neighbors of the Daily Mammal Facebook liker who lives in Trinidad and Tobago. Do...

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Pacarana (Dinomys branickii)
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Number 0421 The pacarana is one of the largest rodents, weighing up to 33 pounds (15 kilograms). It lives in South America, and it’s pretty mysterious. It wasn’t discovered by science until 1872, and according to my pacarana Safari Card, “No more was heard of it for some 25 years.” The IUCN lists it as vulnerable because its numbers appear to be declining. It’s...

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Random Week: Indian Crested Porcupine (Hystrix indica)
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Number 0419 Before our brief Olympic interlude, I was enjoying letting random.org pick the mammals, so let’s get back to that with another random week. Today, the Indian crested porcupine’s number is up. It’s a nocturnal rodent that lives in the region of Asia and the Middle East bordered on one end by Turkey and Syria and on the other by Kyrgyzstan and India....

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Mammal Olympiad: Long Jump: Merriam’s Kangaroo Rat (Dipodomys merriami)
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Number 0417 As the humans compete in the London Olympics, the other mammals have an Olympiad of their own here at the Daily Mammal! Today’s mammalympian is an amazing long jumper, Merriam’s kangaroo rat, which lives throughout the southwestern United States and in Mexico. It’s nocturnal and solitary and eats mostly seeds, including the seeds of creosote, mesquite, and ocotillo. This little rodent bounces...

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Random Week: Rakali (Hydromys chrysogaster)
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Number 0412 Today’s lottery winner, picked by random.org, is the water rat or rakali, an interesting rodent from Australia. The rakali is one of Australia’s two amphibious mammals, the other being the platypus, and in fact, people often think they’re watching a platypus when they’re really looking at a rakali. Both animals live in burrows dug into the banks of rivers, lakes, irrigation ditches,...

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Indochinese Flying Squirrel (Hylopetes phayrei)
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Number 0410 I let random.org pick the mammal today, and a little flying squirrel turned up (a rodent, of course!). This guy lives in China, Vietnam, Thailand, and Myanmar (Burma). I can’t find much information about it, in my books or online, and to find most of my reference photos, I had to search for the Thai name, which seems to be กระรอกบินเล็กแก้มขาว. The...

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Murines Five Ways
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Murines Five Ways

Jul 20, 2012 by

Numbers 405, 406, 407, 408, and 409 Here are three rats and two mice from the Old World rats and mice subfamily of the rodent order. Clockwise from the top right, may I introduce Tokudaia muenninki, Muennink’s spiny rat or the Okinawan spiny rat; Apodemus sylvaticus, the wood mouse or long-tailed field mouse; Arvicanthis niloticus, the African grass rat; Apomys datae, the Luzon montane...

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Rat (Rattus norvegicus)
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By Coco Hello everybody!!! Today I drew a rat! Here is some information about them. I hope you enjoy! If you have rats in your house they are either pets or pests right? Well in my case they are pets! And I know one thing for a fact!! People say they are disgusting, evil, little biters! Even if they have red eyes that does...

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Harvest mouse (Micromys minutus)
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By Coco Here are some facts about the Harvest mouse. -Harvest mice live in tall grasses. -They make there nest out of the tall grasses around them. -There nests are about 4 inches in diameter. -An adult Harvest mouse weighs about 5-11 g. -They are about 1-3 inches tall, there tail is also 1-3 inches long. -They can live at the most 7 years...

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Red Squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris)
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by Coco Hi everyone, Here are some facts about Red Squirrels. I hope you enjoy them! -Red Squirrels are 8-9 inches tall. -Their tail is just about the same length reaching 8-9 inches! -What is the long tail used for? *Like lots of mammals it is used for balance. *It helps them steer while they are jumping from tree to tree. *It helps them...

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Random Rodent: Acacia Rat (Thallomys paedulcus)
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Number 0397 I know you’ve heard it before, but the rodents are a problem. They account for some 40 percent of the mammals, and nearly all of them are small beige lumps. Many of them have evaded photographers up to now, so I often have to base my drawing on a related rodent but make changes based on the descriptions I can find. It’s...

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Primorye Week: Siberian Flying Squirrel (Pteromys volans)
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Number 0392 This week, we’re looking at a few mammals from Primorye, a region in the far east of Russia that you can learn a bit more about in my post for Monday’s musk deer. For today, Coco and I drew Siberian flying squirrels. They are quite common throughout the forests of northern Europe and Asia, where they glide through the treetops by night,...

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Primorye Week: Two Rodents (Myodes rutilus and Apodemus peninsulae)
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Numbers 0389 and 0390 This week, we’re meeting the mammals of Primorye, a region in far eastern Russia. (See yesterday’s musk deer for a little more about that fascinating area of the planet.) Well, it’s late and I’ve had a rough day, so…I don’t have much to say about these two rodents, other than that the one on the left is the northern red-backed...

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Colorado Chipmunk (Tamias quadrivittatus)
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Number 0387 The day after the kids and I drew this chipmunk (I haven’t scanned their drawings—sorry!), we rode the tram to the top of Sandia Peak here in Albuquerque. At the top, we stood on a deck overlooking the mountainside and the city below, and who should we spy skittering on the rocks in front of us but a handful of Colorado chipmunks!...

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Random Week: Gregarious Short-tailed Rat (Brachyuromys ramirohitra)
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Number 0383 This week, I’m drawing mammals selected randomly by random.org. Each day, it’s a surprise to me, and this should be a good way to get through some of the mammals that I would be unlikely to choose on my own…like this one, the gregarious short-tailed rat. Nothing against him, but there’s very little information available about him and very few photographs for...

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Five Random Rodents
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Numbers 0376, 0377, 0378, 0379 and 0380 Rodents keep me up at night. I can hear them scritch-scritch-scritching in the attic and the walls. Their whiskers lightly tickle my skin and their buck teeth gnaw on my bones. Their beady little eyes stare at me from every corner, glinting in the dark. Not because my house is infested—it isn’t—but because of the Daily Mammal...

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Japan Benefit: ニホンリス (Japanese Squirrel) (Sciurus lis)
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This week we’re raising money for people and animals in Japan, and you can help! More details in just a moment… Number 0370 The Japanese squirrel is endemic to Japan, where it is called Nihon risu. It has a red coat in the summer and a grayish-brown one in the fall. This particular fellow looks like he’s getting ready for summer! He’d love to...

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Two Beautiful Squirrels (Callosciurus prevostii, C. finlaysonii)
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Numbers 0364 and 0365 Well, mammals, we made it! Mammal Number 365 is here, with his buddy Number 364, ready to meet you and celebrate a year’s worth of Daily Mammals, completed on average once every four days, which doesn’t sound too bad, until you do the math and realize that at that rate, it will take me an additional 52 years to draw...

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Muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus)
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Number 0362 I was going to give you an MP3 of “Muskrat Love,” either the Captain & Tennille or the America version, but that song is just so bad that I couldn’t stand to do it. So instead, I will direct you to the Everything Muskrat website, an impressively comprehensive compendium of, indeed, everything muskrat, and to a 2008 article from the Washington Post...

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Sewellel (Aplodontia rufa)
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Number 0350 The sewellel, which is also known as the mountain beaver, even though it doesn’t live in the mountains and isn’t much of a beaver, lives along the coasts of British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, and California, in moist, cool, rain forest environments. It is one of the most primitive rodents in existence, meaning that it really isn’t different from its ancient fossilized ancestors,...

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Degu (Octodon degus)
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Number 0347 It has been so long since I posted a drawing that I kind of don’t remember how. I hope I haven’t missed anything in this post. I have about ten drawings that I haven’t posted yet, and I’ll be posting them over the next several days. Then I hope to get back to drawing. The degu is a rodent that lives only...

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World Cup: Four Swiss Voles
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Numbers 0343, 0344, 0345, and 0346 Our last competitors in the mammalian World Cup are these four fellows from Switzerland. Clockwise from the top right, we have the European water vole (Arvicola aquatica), the European snow vole (Chionomys nivalis), the European pine vole (Microtus subterraneus), and the bank vole (Myodes glareolus). Some good news about these guys: they are all widespread throughout their ranges...

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World Cup: Group E
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World Cup: Group E

Jun 29, 2010 by

Number 0328 Hi, mammals! I think I’ll be on track to finish the Mammals of the World Cup on schedule with the actual World Cup if I post all of Group E today and then get back to once-a-day tomorrow. (Whether I will succeed is still unknown, as life has been pretty stressful around here. But I’m trying!) Also, I’m really not doing my...

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World Cup: England’s European Beaver (Castor fiber)
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Number 0320 So I somehow picked a mammal for England that’s been extinct in England for, oh, about 400 years or so. Yep. The European beaver was hunted nearly to extinction by the 20th century, and no longer existed in most countries of Europe. Now it’s being reintroduced, and it has successfully regained a place in a couple dozen European countries, such as Denmark...

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World Cup: Argentina’s Patagonian Mara (Dolichotis patagonum)
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Number 0318 To celebrate the World Cup, I’m drawing and writing about one mammal from each of the 32 countries that are participating. Those 32 countries are divided into eight groups, and today we continue meeting Group B with a visit to Argentina. The Patagonian mara is a long-legged rodent that lives only in Argentina, and it’s one of only a handful of monogamous...

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