Navigation Menu+
Geoffroy Week: Rufous-naped Tamarin (Saguinus geoffroyi)
Read more

Number 0429 In 1798, Napoleon invaded Egypt in a bid to interfere with British trade routes and generally prove his might. (He did everything generally—get it?) Along with tens of thousands of soldiers, he took some 150 scientists and other intellectuals who studied Egyptian culture, history, geology, and wildlife. Napoleon invited both Cuvier and Geoffroy along; only Geoffroy went. He ended up being stranded...

Read more
Geoffroy Week: Geoffroy’s Marmoset (Callithrix geoffroyi)
Read more

Number 0427 I’m unhappy with this marmoset drawing. The eyes are too far apart. But I had already spent a very long time working on a composition that showed the beautiful feathery tortoiseshell fur on the marmoset’s back, and it just didn’t work, and I had to finally just draw something, no matter how unsatisfactory, so here. (I blame the Lefty Frizzell I was...

Read more
Bengal Hanuman Langur (Semnopithecus entellus)
Read more

Number 0424 Meet the Bengal Hanuman langur or northern plains gray langur, a monkey that lives in India and Bangladesh. It’s named after Hanuman, the Hindu monkey god. Hanuman is featured in the Indian epic Ramayana, in which he helps Rama rescue his true love Sita and defeat a powerful demon. I haven’t read the Ramayana, but if About.com is to be believed (hmm),...

Read more
Mammal Olympiad: Gymnastics: Buff-cheeked Gibbon (Nomascus gabriellae)
Read more

Number 0416 While the human Olympics continue in London, the Mammal Olympiad continues here on the Daily Mammal! Today, we have a gymnast. As with human gymnastics, mammal gymnastics is difficult to judge in that there’s no fastest, no deepest, no highest. The best gymnast is the one who performs the most skillfully, gracefully, powerfully, and beautifully. In searching for the creature who might...

Read more
Random Week: Red-handed Howler Monkey (Alouatta belzebul)
Read more

Number 0414 Here’s our last randomly picked mammal for now: tomorrow the Mammal Olympiad starts! Let’s let this red-handed howler monkey see us out of Random Week. The red-handed howler lives in Brazil. Among howler monkeys, it isn’t very well studied, by which I mean that humans haven’t studied it very well, not that it isn’t learned or educated. It eats leaves (because it’s...

Read more
Random Week: Mongoose Lemur (Eulemur mongoz)
Read more

Number 0411 This week, random.org is picking our mammals, and the random-number generator made me very happy this morning. Instead of the statistically likely rodent, we get a lemur! Hello, mongoose lemur. We can tell that this one is a male because his cheeks and beard are red; females are plain gray and white. The mongoose lemur is a little unusual among lemurs for...

Read more
Common Marmoset (Callithrix jacchus)
Read more

  Number 0384 Like many people, some of us Kinyaks are addicted to Angry Birds. The last edition we played, Angry Birds Rio, is a tie-in with the animated movie Rio, which I haven’t seen and don’t plan to, but I assume the characters in the game come from the movie. While the original Angry Birds game has pigs as the birds’ enemies, in...

Read more
Golden Snub-Nosed Monkey (Rhinopithecus roxellana)
Read more

Number 0381 Golden snub-nosed monkeys live in central China, with the majority making their homes in the Sichuan province. They roam through mountain forests where snow covers the ground for half the year, eating lichens and other ploants and the occasional insect. They are endangered, and the IUCN tells us that the major threats to their continued existence are habitat loss and tourism-related activities....

Read more
Japan Benefit: ニホンザル (Japanese Macaque) (Macaca fuscata)
Read more

This week’s drawings, by me and by Coco, are for sale to benefit animals and people affected by the earthquake and tsunami in Japan! If you buy a drawing, we’ll give half of the purchase price to the American Red Cross and half to Animal Refuge Kansai, an animal shelter in Japan. You can select a matted drawing or leave it unmatted. Unmatted, they’re...

Read more
Horsfield’s Tarsier (Tarsius bancanus)
Read more

Number 0360 I know we just met the greater slow loris the other day, but here is another fuzzy fellow with huge, unmoving eyes and a neck that swivels 180 degrees. Horsfield’s tarsier lives in Brunei, Indonesia, and Malaysia, where he climbs in the trees and forages on the ground, looking for insects like cicadas, moths, stick bugs, and cockroaches, as well as bats,...

Read more
Greater Slow Loris (Nycticebus coucang)
Read more

Number 0357 Now, this is an interesting little primate. The greater slow loris (there are a few other kinds of lorises, as well) lives in Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand. It’s nocturnal and its eyes don’t move—it has to turn its head to look around. It’s very solitary, crawling around in the trees, eating sap and fruit and snails and eggs. Inside each of...

Read more
Repeat: Common Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes)
Read more

Until February 24, 2011, I hadn’t posted a mammal since July 10, 2010. Why? Well, the kids kept me busy, and that’s an understatement. Most of it was just general exhaustion. But I was also a bit burned out after my World Cup series, a month-long extravaganza of mammals that involved a whole lot of research about soccer and different countries in addition to...

Read more
Mating Week: Saddleback Tamarin (Saguinus fuscicollis)
Read more

Number 0356 I’ve decided to go ahead and call this an official theme week. This is the fifth and last entry in our Daily Mammal Mating Week. The saddleback tamarin, which lives in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru, practices polyandry, which means that a single female mates with more than one male. (Polygamy technically refers to a marriage or partnership with more than...

Read more
World Cup: Paraguay’s Black-and-Gold Howler Monkey (Alouatta caraya)
Read more

Number 0333 We are approximately one-third of the way to 1,000 mammals today, which would be in turn one-fifth of the way to all the mammals there are. Let’s celebrate that, as well as the World Cup, with this sad-looking black-and-gold howler monkey from Paraguay! The black-and-gold howler is also called the black howler, but so is at least one other howler monkey species...

Read more
World Cup: Group E
Read more

World Cup: Group E

Jun 29, 2010 by

Number 0328 Hi, mammals! I think I’ll be on track to finish the Mammals of the World Cup on schedule with the actual World Cup if I post all of Group E today and then get back to once-a-day tomorrow. (Whether I will succeed is still unknown, as life has been pretty stressful around here. But I’m trying!) Also, I’m really not doing my...

Read more
World Cup: Algeria’s Barbary Macaque (Macaca sylvanus)
Read more

Number 0322 The World Cup is swinging right along, and we’re celebrating with a look at the mammals of the 32 countries competing in the tournament. Today we’re in Algeria, where they have these monkeys, see, the Barbary macaques. They live in the forests of Algeria and Morocco, and there’s also a population in Gibraltar, making them the only primates that live freely in...

Read more
World Cup: South Africa’s Vervet Monkey (Chlorocebus pygerythrus)
Read more

Number 0312 The World Cup started this past Friday, and I’m into it, partly because of this Nike commercial and partly because of this book (Cosmopolitanism by Kwame Anthony Appiah, which I enthusiastically recommend), which has me convinced of the importance of being a true citizen of the world. The international soccer/football tournament happens every four years, and this time, it’s in South Africa—the...

Read more
Bonobo (Pan paniscus)
Read more

Number 0309 There are two kinds of people: bonobos and chimpanzees. I’m more of a chimpanzee, I think. I’m hostile, territorial, and antisocial, I don’t like rubbing genitals with most other people, and I hate being groomed by others.* Bonobos have been called the hippies of the great apes, the Venus to the chimpanzees’ Mars. Like the chimpanzees, bonobos (also called pygmy chimpanzees) share...

Read more
Verreaux’s Sifaka (Propithecus verreauxi)
Read more

Number 0301 Oh, Madgascar, oh lemurs. Here is another, the magnificent Verreaux’s sifaka, who performs the most powerful of leaps through the air and the most comical of leaps on the ground. Theo drew one, too, and his shows their incredible speed, but all in all, we’ll let Attenborough do the talking for us. Please watch the video below Theo’s drawing. It’s...

Read more
Aye-aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis)
Read more

Number 0293 The aye-aye is the only mammal I can think of that is primarily known for being ugly. Anytime someone writes a think-piece about the primacy of “charismatic megafauna” in conservation efforts, the poor aye-aye comes up as an example of an uncharismatic animal that is nevertheless in need of protection and aid. (People seem to want to donate money to help animals...

Read more
Gelada Monkey (Theropithecus gelada)
Read more

Number 0288 High in the mountains of Ethiopia live large groups of monkeys, the geladas, who spend their days grazing on grass, mating, socializing, and making a variety of interesting sounds that some people speculate could reveal something about the evolution of human language and music. Also known as bleeding-heart baboons and lion baboons (although they aren’t actually baboons), the geladas are the only...

Read more
Black-handed Spider Monkey (Ateles geoffroyi)
Read more

Number 0287 These incredibly agile monkeys live throughout Central America. They’re very social, swinging through the treetops in groups of 20 or 30, munching on fruit, leaves, and flowers. They’re important distributors of fruit seeds, dispersing them through their digestive system. Unfortunately, the black-handed spider monkey is endangered due to habitat...

Read more
White-Handed Gibbon (Hylobates lar)
Read more

Number 0279 The white-handed gibbon, also known as the lar gibbon, is an endangered rainforest ape that lives in southeast Asia, from Sumatra and Malaysia to Myanmar, Thailand, and possibly part of China, although they’re likely extinct in that country. These gibbons are endangered because of their popularity in the pet trade, but especially because of deforestation and the disappearing rain forests. I’m considering...

Read more
Emperor Tamarin (Saguinus imperator)
Read more

Number 0272 I have two things I’d like to share with you about the emperor tamarin (also known as the emperor marmoset). First, according to Mammals—Their Latin Names Explained by A.F. Gotch, “A taxidermist, so the story goes, had never seen a live tamarin and twisted the white ‘moustache’ upwards to look like the Emperor of Germany, instead of letting it droop in the...

Read more
Scientific Names Week: Olive Baboon (Papio anubis)
Read more

Number 0252 The olive baboon lives in a wide swath of land across the middle of Africa. It’s one of those rare mammals that not only is safe from extinction, but whose numbers seem to be growing. Let’s all celebrate that ’cause it gets depressing around here, doesn’t it? Papio in the baboon’s scientific name comes from a French word for baboon (according to...

Read more
Scientific Names Week: Cotton-top Tamarin (Saguinus oedipus)
Read more

Number 0250 I love words and names for things, and I’ve enjoyed learning a little Latin and Greek as I draw these mammals. Let’s spend a few days meeting some mammals with interesting scientific names, starting with this wild-and-woolly tamarin. The cotton-top part of his common name is apt, but what about Saguinus oedipus? Saguinus means “like a squirrel monkey,” which is straightforward. The...

Read more
Coffee Achievers Days: Formosan Rock Macaque (Macaca cyclopis)
Read more

The Daily Mammal Book Club discussion of My Family and Other Animals is in full swing! Number 0244 Here’s one last Coffee Achiever: the Formosan rock macaque, who eats coffee berries and spits out the pits, like you and I would do with cherries. Supposedly, people roast the spit-out coffee beans and sell the coffee for big bucks. I’m just glad to know that...

Read more
Diana Monkey (Cercopithecus diana) and Daily Mammal Book Club!
Read more

  Number 0241 Okay, mammals, I’m back! And I have an announcement. I’m starting a Daily Mammal Book Club. Any mammals who want to join are welcome (at least, the ones that can read). We’ll read a book together and discuss it here on the Daily Mammal. Let’s have the first discussion of the first book the week of March 16. That gives everyone...

Read more
Hibernators Week: Fat-tailed Dwarf Lemur (Cheirogaleus medius)
Read more

Number 0222 Well, I originally picked this lemur for Hibernators Week because I was under the impression that it was an estivator (see Sunday’s post if you’re wondering what I’m talking about). My beloved but flawed Ivan T. Sanderson told me that, as did Animal Diversity Web. But from what I can tell, that’s not necessarily correct. These Malagasy lemurs go into torpor between...

Read more
Mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx)
Read more

Number 0217 Mandrills! The vividly beautiful faces of the males fill me with the same kind of heart-aching longing that I get when looking at pictures of the Paris couture shows. Just perfectly, unreasonably, untouchably beautiful. In fact mandrills are the most colorful of mammals (sigh…it’s all drab from here, folks). They’re also the biggest of the monkeys. They live in the African countries...

Read more
Proboscis Monkey (Nasalis larvatus)
Read more

Number 0201 Well, here’s a good opposites-attract companion for yesterday’s tiny-nosed Tonkin snub: the proboscis monkey, which lives only in Borneo. You will have noticed his floppy nose (and it’s only the males who have such gigantic honkers), but you probably don’t want to stare. It’s okay: I bet this monkey feels about his schnozz the same way Edmond Rostand’s Cyrano felt about his:...

Read more