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Warthog (Phacochoerus aethiopicus)
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Number 0185 I need to go to bed, so I won’t say too much about warthogs, except that they live in Africa south of the Sahara and can go for months without water. And they dig holes to hang out in, keeping themselves warm when it’s cold out and cool when it’s hot. The Wonders of Animal Life books I mentioned in my mountain...

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Common Eland (Taurotragus oryx)
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Number 0178 Elands (of which there are two species, this one and the giant eland, which isn’t actually any more giant than this one, although this one is a bit more common than the giant one) are huge antelopes that live in Africa. Because they have very nutritious milk and decent meat and useful hides, people have tried, with varying success, to domesticate them...

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Eight Belles
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Eight Belles

May 3, 2008 by

Number 0153 If you know me, you know that I’m a long-time horse lover. I’ve been putting off drawing a horse for this project because once it’s drawn, it’s drawn, and there’s another 13 years of not drawing horses. Also, if the goal is for me to draw every mammal species, well, I’ve drawn tens of thousands of horses already. But I was glad...

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Mammalthon 2: Texas Longhorn (Bos taurus)
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Number 0151 The Texas longhorn, which is a breed of the domestic cow, is a pretty special American animal. It’s descended from the first cattle that were brought to North America (by the Spanish), and it’s the only breed of cow to evolve on its own, without human direction. Rangy and lean, longhorns can survive in extremely harsh environments. While they once roamed the...

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Mammals of New Mexico Week: Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana)
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The 24-Hour Mammalthon has been rescheduled. It is now on May 3, 2008. There are still several slots available, so look over in the right-hand navigation bar and reserve your mammal today. It’s for a good cause. Number 0145 The pronghorn is often called an antelope, but it’s not really an antelope. Another nickname for it is speed goat, but it’s not a goat,...

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Striped Mammal Week: Okapi (Okapia johnstoni)
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Number 0133 Here’s an okapi. I’ll write more about okapis tomorrow night. For now, just know that they’re related to giraffes and live in the rain forests of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. (I’m also going to find out what the standard shortened form of Democratic Republic of the Congo is tomorrow, I...

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North Carolina Week: White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus)
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Number 0116 It’s the last day of North Carolina Week, time to bid adieu—for now—to our Carolinian mammal friends. Looking back at us as we wave goodbye is this white-tailed deer. White-tailed deer live from Canada to Central America, including nearly all of the United States. They are, according to Animal Diversity Web, the jumpiest, most nervous of our deer, and they swish their...

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North Carolina Week: European Wild Boar (Sus scrofa)
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Number 0114 Native to Europe, North Africa, and Asia, the European wild boar came to North Carolina in 1912 when a man working in the Snowbird Mountains had 14 of them shipped over to start a game preserve. By the early 1920s, those 14 had grown into 60–100, and a hunt was held with dogs. Well, the hunters managed to kill only two of...

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24 Hours: Elk (Wapiti)
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Number 0094 This is for Maleta. She gave me my choice, and I choose an elk! I know Maleta likes animals that can be found in New Mexico, and this is one. —————- Now playing: Explosions In The Sky – Welcome, Ghosts via...

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24 Hours: Gerenuk (Who knows?)
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Number 0092 Joe said “Pick something obscure that you think would be fun to draw,” so here, Joe, is your gerenuk, also called the giraffe-necked antelope! He was indeed fun to draw. If you want to see some really strange and beautiful creatures, look for photos of the gerenuk. —————- Now playing: Teddy Pendergrass – Love TKO via...

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24 Hours: Alpaca (Lama pacos)
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Number 0088 Well, I’m not quite half done, and I’m already starting to feel a little They Shoot Horses, Don’t They? Luckily, I have a 44-ounce vanilla Dr. Pepper here to see me through! I apologize to everyone who requested a mammal after I’d already gotten 24; I promise to draw your mammals and send you your art next week! Thank you for your...

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24 Hours: Domesticated Donkey (Equus asinus)
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Number 0085 Hi Mom! Here’s your donkey! It’s too bad no one requested a lamb and a cow and a baby human, because this baby donkey looks like he’d fit right in at a nativity scene. I just realized, when I looked up the Latin name for donkeys, that the word asinine means, literally, ass-like, in the same way canine means dog-like and feline...

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Saiga Antelope (Saiga tatarica)
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Number 0076 I just love these guys; sadly, saigas are severely endangered, owing to habitat destruction and, especially, widespread poaching—their horns are a valuable ingredient in traditional Chinese medicine. In fact, their numbers have plummeted almost 95 percent in less than 20 years, a rate that is unheard of and very alarming. They live on the steppes of central Asia. Some think their strange...

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Giant Forest Hog (Hylochoerus meinertzhageni)
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Number 0074 These wild hogs live in central Africa. The male of the species is a vicious fellow, liable to attack his fellow hog with great ferocity, sometimes butting heads so hard that someone’s cranium busts. According to the Ultimate Ungulate website, when two male giant forest hogs fight, “The victor urinates, grinds his teeth, and bites at the loser, who in turn flees...

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Domestic Sheep (Ovis aries)
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Number 0072 Sheep have been domesticated for between 9,000 and 11,000 years. Scientists still haven’t figured out for sure which wild sheep species the domestic sheep descend from, but I can tell you that domestic sheep have smaller eye sockets and brain cases than their wild brethren. Also, various strains of sheep have been bred to have no wool, no horns, and no external...

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Chilean Huemul (Hippocamelus bisulcus)
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Number 0071 This tough little deer is also called the south Andean deer or the guemal instead of huemul. There are only somewhere between 1,000 and 2,000 of them left in the world, but this is actually an improvement over their numbers a decade or two ago. This huemul is one of Chile’s national symbols. The south Andean variety, like this fellow, lives only...

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Malayan Tapir (Tapirus indicus)
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Number 0066 My cousin Hilary asked me to draw a tapir, and as there are a few different species, I chose this one, the only tapir native to Asia (the others live in South America). This one here is a baby; when they grow up, they lose the stripes and spots and just get one wide white band across their middle and back end....

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Bongo (Tragelaphus eurycerus)
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Number 0059 The Bongo is a large African antelope. Both males and females have “lyre-shaped” horns. (I love that description—lyre-shaped.) Their numbers are decreasing, and they’re threatened by the destruction of their forest habitat. One idea that might help bongos is the establishment of wildlife corridors that would let them safely travel from one national park to another. To learn more, visit the African...

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Guanaco (Lama guanicoe)
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Number 0056 This guanaco is for Leigh. He’s seen them in the wild. They live in the Andes. They look especially beautiful in front of blue mountains or on the beach. Here is an extra treat for Daily Mammal visitors (click to...

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Bearded Pig (Sus barbatus)
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Number 0052 This fellow lives in Sumatra and Malaysia. Although he’s called a bearded pig, he’s actually a mustachioed pig. Enhancing the cut of his jib is the fact that he’s the slenderest of all the pigs. He wears it well, doesn’t he? Ted thinks he should wear a monocle, while I picture him in a top...

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Hartebeest (Alcelaphus buselaphus)
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Number 0050 This particular hartebeest is a red hartebeest. Hartebeests live in Africa, and they are popular among hunters. Especially after they’re dead. Their coloring is quite lovely, as are their spiraling horns. Thanks to the hartebeest, I’ve discovered a new source for profiles of mammals: ESPN.com’s hunting section! It has illustrations, rather than the more standard photographs of dudes grinning over the carcass,...

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Babirusa (Babyrousa babyrussa)
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Number 0042 This fellow is a babirusa, a Malaysian wild hog whose Latin name means “pig deer.” See the top tusks? Well, those are his upper incisors, which curve up through the roof of a male babirusa’s snout and cross in front as they grow. The best guess as to why the babirusa has these tusks is that they protect his eyes from his...

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Zebu (Bos indicus)
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Zebu (Bos indicus)

Jul 8, 2007 by

Number 0035 The zebu is a domestic cow from Asia and Africa; zebus are also known as Brahmas. I was reminded of the zebu’s existence this week when Andy Merriell, my employer, showed me a wonderful book called The 100 Best Animals. Zebus have floppy dewlaps and shoulder humps and curved horns and they’re amazingly tolerant of heat. It seems there’s a lot of...

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Kirk’s Dik-dik (Madoqua kirkii)
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Number 0034 Ramona requested a dik-dik drawing, and I believe Carlos did, too. Dik-diks are the world’s smallest antelopes. There are several species of them; this one was named for Sir John Kirk, a 19th-century British diplomat in Zanzibar. The dik-dik part of the name is an onomatopoetic word for the animal’s whistle of fear. Dik-diks, which top out at 12 or 13 pounds...

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Nile Hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius)
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Number 0033 First, apologies for falling behind on the mammals! My Internet was down and I just started my new job this week, etc. I will be all caught up by tomorrow. In the meantime, please consider this a Thursday hippopotamus, and it’s for Sandra! More...

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American Bison (Bison bison)
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Number 0032 Happy independence day! Here is a symbol of America, the American bison. I drive past a small herd of them every day on my way home from work. Sometime I want to try to draw one when it’s shedding its winter coat, when just the shoulders are padded with the thick, matted fur. The New York Times had an article a few...

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Puku (Kobus vardonii)
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Number 0027 I’ve started to worry that I will draw all the mammals that I know or that I find interesting or that other people like in the first couple years of my project, leaving me with more than a decade of obscure, never-photographed mammals and lots of rodents. I checked out a book from the library called Mammals—Their Latin Names Explained by A.F....

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(Baby) Asian Elephant (Elephas maximus)
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Number 0018 This one is for Raecheleia! Asian elephants, also called Indian elephants, are smaller than the African ones, with smaller ears, too, and they’re easier to train, so they are frequently used as beasts of burden. They are endangered in the wild. This one’s a baby with fur on his head and wrinkles all over. I’m moving across the country in about six...

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Javelina (Tayassu tajacu)
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Number 0013 Javelinas live in the desert southwest, just like me. They travel in herds, and members of a herd smell alike, thanks to the javelinas’ habit of rubbing against their friends to mingle musks. It helps them remember who’s who and keeps them from getting lost, as their eyesight is quite poor. Javelinas, which are also called peccaries, have coarse fur, small hooves,...

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Moose (Alces americanus)
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Number 0006 Here is Leigh’s moose. Leigh has only one more mammal coming to him! I read this on Animal Diversity Web: “Moose are limited to cool regions because of their large bodies, inability to sweat, and the heat produced by fermentation in their gut.” Aren’t you glad you don’t have fermentation in your gut that produces uncomfortable heat? I assume you don’t,...

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