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Geoffroy Week: Chuditch (Dasyurus geoffroii)
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Number 0428 Geoffroy Week continues at the Daily Mammal. Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire planned to join the clergy as a teenager. He became a canon of the church at 15 and was earnestly studying the world beyond this one when his eyes were opened to the mysteries of the world where we live right now. He was turning away from Catholicism and toward Deism when...

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Agile Antechinus (Antechinus agilis)
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Number 0403 This fellow is one of a group of species called broad-footed marsupial mice. They’re small, carnivorous marsupials native to Australia. I drew this sometime last year, I think, and I don’t know where I found this guy because the species is not in any of my books or in my mammal species database. It was first described in 1998, having previously been...

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Eastern Quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus)
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  By Coco Hi Daily Mammal readers, this is Coco, and I am now an official Daily Mammal contributor.!! Yay Coco!! Above is my FIRST mammal that I posted on my own. Let me tell you about it! What does Dasyurus mean? It means hairy tail. Quolls’ tails are 20-35cm long. They are about the size of a cat. They live on the ground in rocks...

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Short-eared Brushtail Possum (Trichosurus caninus)
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Number 0396 I drew this fellow last week, and just now, sitting down to research him, I ended up tumbling about in my books and online, finding not a lot about the possum—he’s a marsupial who lives in a little-bitty sliver of eastern Australia—but several other bits and pieces somewhat related to the species, which is also known as the bobuck. For instance, as...

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Pretty-faced Wallaby (Macropus parryi)
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Number 0385 Coco did the write-up for today’s mammal, the pretty-faced or whip-tail wallaby. Take it away, Coco! Pretty-faced wallabies are found in Australia. There are many different kinds of wallabies. They have very strong back legs that are great for traveling long distances. They use their tail for balance as they hop around. Some marsupials have back-opening pouches so the dirt doesn’t get...

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Goodfellow’s Tree Kangaroo (Dendrolagus goodfellowi)
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I’m eager to introduce you to an enchanting tree kangaroo, but first let me remind you that starting Sunday, Coco and I will be selling original drawings of the mammals of Japan with all proceeds helping victims of the earthquakes and tsunamis. See yesterday’s post for the details!   Number 0367 I have fallen in love with tree kangaroos. They are my new favorite...

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Mating Week: Brown Antechinus (Antechinus stuartii)
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Number 0355 Every female wants a good father for her babies. Every male wants a good mother for his babies. That’s what life is all about. The more I study other animals, the more I think the meaning of life is: have sex and have babies, and have sex and babies with a mate or mates of good quality. Is there any other reason...

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World Cup: The Rest of Group D
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Number 0325 Because I missed a few days and because if I don’t step on the gas the World Cup will end before the World Cup of Mammals does, tonight I’m posting the final three mammals of Group D (the other being Serbia’s marbled polecat from the other day). This first one is the topi (Damaliscus korrigum), an antelope representing Ghana. Ghana was the...

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Greater Glider (Petauroides volans)
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Number 0300 Here’s our 300th mammal! That’s right, in almost exactly three years of drawing mammals, I have less than a year’s worth of drawings to show for it. We could celebrate this milestone or rue its inadequacy: your choice. By request, here’s the greater glider! This adorable marsupial, which surely has the world’s cutest ears, lives in the eucalyptus forests of Australia. Up...

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Common Wombat (Vombatus ursinus)
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Number 0291 Wombats are Australian marsupials, and the common wombat is, naturally, the most common of the three wombat species. Common wombats live along the coast of southeastern Australia, in alpine areas and sandy places. The wombats’ claim to fame is that they are the only known large, herbivorous burrowing mammals: all the other burrowing herbivores are small, and all the other large burrowers...

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Brush-tailed Phascogale (Phascogale tapoatafa)
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Number 0286 The brush-tailed phascogale (also called the tuan or the brush-tailed marsupial mouse) is a marsupial that lives in a few scattered regions around the edges of Australia. Brush-tailed phascogales (perhaps I’ll call them BTPs) are arboreal, nocturnal, and solitary—in other words, they scamper around the treetops at night, all alone in the moonlight. They like to eat lizards, birds, insects, and small...

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Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus harrisii)
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Number 0262 Tasmanian devils are feisty, aggressive guys, with a screech that’s invariably described as bloodcurdling or bone-chilling. They dine on carrion, and they especially love to eat dead wallabies and opossums. They get into scuffles over their food, during which they nip at each other’s faces, and their complicated, violent mating rituals also involve rival males biting each other’s faces. Tasmanian devils have...

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Scientific Names Week: Little Red Kaluta (Dasykaluta rosamondae)
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Number 0253 This little marsupial is widespread in the desert of northwestern Australia, where it likes to eat insects and small vertebrates. The young are born in November, and they’re old enough to mate by the time kaluta mating season rolls around the following September. Sadly, all males die shortly after the mating season, apparently from the stress of competing for females! In this...

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Hibernators Week: Mountain Pygmy Possum (Burramys parvus)
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Number 0223 These teensy marsupials live in the Australian alps (and boast the saddest IUCN range map I’ve ever seen). They hibernate in the winter under a thick layer of snow. In the warmer months, they eat lots and lots and lots of moths, along with some other things, and also store berries and seeds to munch on when they occasionally wake from torpor....

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Mammals of Hawaii: Brush-Tailed Rock Wallaby (Petrogale penicillata)
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Number 0210 Today we continue our celebration of President-Elect Barack Obama and his home state of Hawaii! The brush-tailed rock wallaby, native to Australia, was once common throughout that continent; now it’s confined to tiny parts of Queensland, New South Wales, and Victoria. The Victoria population, in particular, is near extinction. These fuzzy marsupials live on rocky ledges and…Wait, what’s that? Oh, yes, Hawaii!...

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Striped Possum (Dactylopsila trivirgata)
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Number 0194 Nocturnal, arboreal, and marsupial, the striped possum, who lives in Australia and New Guinea, is about the size of a squirrel. This fellow munches and lunches on insects, flowers, leaves, fruit, small invertebrates, and sweet local honey. If you’re out and about in an Australian forest of a summer evening, listen for rustling and crunching sounds overhead, and watch for falling leftovers:...

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Eastern Barred Bandicoot (Perameles gunnii)
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Number 0175 The eastern barred bandicoot is a critically endangered Australian marsupial. Animal Diversity Web says there are only about 300–400 of them alive in the wild. They eat mainly insects and worms, along with some berries and grasses and such. They’re noisy and they leap along the ground. Consecutive days of mammals: 4 Record:...

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Chilean Shrew Opossum (Rhyncholestes raphanurus)
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  Number 0173 The Chilean shrew opossum is an enigmatic little beast. We think it’s solitary. But then again, we think it lives in small family groups. We think it has five or seven or so babies at a time, but who knows? It seems to be nocturnal, since the few that have been captured were captured at night. Nobody knows how long they...

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Southern Marsupial Mole (Notoryctes typhlops)
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Number 0172 The southern marsupial mole is one of two species in the order Notoryctemorphia, one of the remaining mammalian orders that I hadn’t drawn…until now! (After Notoryctemorphia, there are five more orders to cover. They’re all drawn and waiting to meet you!) Marsupial moles, which live in Australia, aren’t at all related to moles; true moles aren’t marsupials. But what’s remarkable about these...

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Monito del Monte (Dromiciops australis)
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Number 0169 One of my goals as the first year of the Daily Mammal comes to a close was to have drawn every order of mammals by June 3. If my calculations are correct, that’s 10 orders (out of 28 or so, depending on who’s counting; we’ve been leaning heavily on the carnivora, primates, and rodentia orders, I think). This one, Microbiotheria, caught my...

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Mammalthon 2: Spotted-Tailed Quoll (Dasyurus maculatus)
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Number 0164 Quolls are one of those wonderful carnivorous marsupials, like my beloved (and extinct) (probably) thylacine. The spotted-tailed quoll used to be called a tiger cat, but that name was so off the mark that it has declined in use. Spotted-tailed quolls live in Australia, naturally, and eat small animals of many kinds. They’ve suffered from habitat loss, trapping, poisoning, and disease, and...

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Striped Mammals Week: Numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus)
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Coming soon: 24-Hour Mammalthon II! Stay tuned! Number 0130 The numbat is a small marsupial that lives in western Australia. Although it’s also known as the banded anteater, it eats nothing but termites—about 20,000 a day. Numbats can’t break into termite mounds on their own, so they have to adjust their schedules to fit the termites’—sleeping when they sleep and hunting when the termites...

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Back Orders: (New Zealand) Brush-tailed Possum (Trichosurus vulpecula)
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Number 0101 Sure, he’s cute, but don’t get too attached. The New Zealand brush-tailed possum (requested by Lauri) is a tragic figure indeed, and it’s best if we can desensitize ourselves a bit. Introduced to New Zealand in the 19th century in order to start a fur trade that didn’t survive into the 20th century, the possums now form an overwhelmingly rampant crew of...

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24 Hours: Platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus)
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Number 0086 I’ve had a few requests for platypuses since I started this project, but I wanted to save it for a special occasion, which this is! While this platypus is most especially for Heather, it is also, in a way, for Allen and for Maggie. Maggie wants me to highlight the way the platypus produces milk. See, the female platypus does not have...

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24 Hours: Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus)
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Number 0083 This might sound incredible to you, but I have to tell you, I know what this koala is dreaming about. Really! He’s dreaming about a little girl who lives in Philadelphia (a place he’s never even visited!). Her name is Claire, and this koala is dreaming about how much he’d like to be friends with...

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Red-necked Pademelon (Thylogale thetis)
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Number 0060 The red-necked pademelon (there are other pademelons, including a red-legged one) is a small wallaby that lives in eastern Australia. It’s nocturnal for the most part, has one joey a year, and like many animals is threatened by habitat destruction—as well as by domestic dogs and cats, dingos, and other predators. Here is a nice 19th-century painting of red-necked...

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Nocturnal Week: Yapok (Chironectes minimus)
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Number 0048 The yapok, also known as the water opossum, is a solitary aquatic marsupial, with webbed hind feet and black-and-white fur. (Like yesterday’s spotted bat, the yapok is one of Herman’s favorites from the Daily Mammal comments. He seems to like black and white spots!) When the yapok is building its nest, it carries leaves rolled up in its tail to line its...

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Nocturnal Week: Spotted Cuscus (Spilocuscus maculatus)
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Number 0046 When I was a girl, I had a subscription to these wildlife cards. Once a month or so—maybe more often—I’d get a small pack of informational cards about animals. There was one species per card. On the front was a photograph of the animal, with its name and some symbols that indicated its class and family, its habitat, and such. On the...

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