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Tonkin Snub-nosed Monkey (Rhinopithecus avunculus)
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Number 0200 This funny fur-face, whose scientific name translates to nose-ape uncle, is one of the world’s rarest mammals. Only about 200 of them exist. They live in forests in a little bitty section of northeastern Vietnam near the Chinese border, where they eat fruit and bamboo and rush around up in the leaves saying “ga-ga! ga-ga!” There are two reasons we’re down to...

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Chinese Stump-tailed Macaque (Macaca thibetana)
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Number 0197 This fuzzy fellow is called the Chinese stump-tailed macaque for reasons that would be obvious if you could see his backside. But he’s also known as the Tibetan macaque and Père David’s macaque. These macaques are frugivorous (they eat fruit) for the most part, but they’ll also eat some insects, leaves, and seeds when the situation warrants. As for Père David, who...

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Daily Mammal Now: Common Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes)
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Number 0191 Daily Mammal Now is an occasional feature that offers a drawing and discussion of a mammal currently in the news. In June of this year, a committee of the Spanish parliament voted to grant limited “human” rights to the other great apes (chimpanzees, bonobos, orangutans, and gorillas). The law, which is expected to go on the books some time in the next...

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Mammalthon 2: Guereza (Colobus guereza)
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Number 0167 Last one! That was sure a looooong 24 hours, wasn’t it? My tía Laura let me pick for her, and I selected this black-and-white colobus monkey species, the guereza. It lives in Africa, and the white feathery fur you see off its shoulder here is called its mantle. It also has a very long tail, not shown here. This guy reminds me...

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Mammalthon 2: The Governor of Hawaii (Homo sapiens)
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Ah well. I tried, but I still can’t draw Governor Paul (or sometimes Phil) Jameson, as played by Richard Denning on Hawaii Five-O, and requested by Chris. This does look more like him than my drawing of Eight Belles looked like her, sadly. —————- Now playing: Flight of the Conchords – A Kiss Is Not a Contract via...

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Mammalthon 2: Black Lemur (Eulemur macaco)
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Number 0150 Here’s a portrait of me and Ted! Maybe not, but Ted did request a black lemur. He was inspired by this fantastic photograph by Joel Sartore. Like all lemurs, the black lemur is native to Madagascar. That means they’re Malagasy! The female, on the left here, looks a lot different from the male, as you can plainly see. Also, there are two...

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Tufted Capuchin (Cebus apella)
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There are about 10 slots left in Mammalthon 2! Come by the site on May 3 to take part in the craziness, and if you’d like to contribute to The Wildlife Center, a wildlife hospital, and receive your own custom-made original art, look to the right-hand navigation bar for more information. Number 0147 The tufted capuchin, which is also known as the brown capuchin...

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Newly Described Mammals Week: John Cleese’s Woolly Lemur (Avahi cleesei)
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Number 0129 On Oscars night, here’s a special lemur named for an Oscar nominee! Discovered by scientists (although, actually, one of the scientists gives credit to their local guide) in 1990, this little woolly lemur was named in honor of actor/writer/director/man’s man/ladies’ man/man-about-town John Cleese 15 years later. Lemurs, which are primates, are unique to Madagascar (maybe not quite unique—apparently there’s another island to...

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Extra mammal: Golden Lion Tamarin (Leontopithecus rosalia)
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  During the 24-Hour Mammalthon in December, or rather after it when I was catching up on my orders, I drew a golden lion tamarin for a boy named Tynan. Rebecca saw that drawing and loved it, and once I opened the Daily Mammal Original Art Shop, Rebecca requested a golden lion tamarin of her own! (You can request a mammal of your own,...

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Back Orders: Golden Lion Tamarin (Leontopithecus rosalia)
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Number 0105 Tynan requested a golden lion tamarin, which is a small monkey that lives in the rain forest in eastern Brazil. It’s extremely endangered—only 1,000–1,500 survive in the wild—mainly because of industrialization and cultivation of its forest habitat. Golden lion tamarins are omnivorous, eating insects, lizards, and fruit. I wonder why they’re so beautifully tangerine-colored. Golden Lion Tamarin Conservation Program (National Zoo) Golden...

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Back orders: Black Howler Monkey (Alouatta pigra)
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Number 0099 This female black howler monkey is for Nicole, who let me choose for her. Why did I choose a female black howler monkey? Well, if you knew Nicole, you wouldn’t ask! Just kidding! Howler monkeys live in the South and Central American rain forests. They are the loudest land animal in the world. (Loudest animal, period, is the blue whale.) You can...

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Human Being (Homo sapiens)
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Number 0055 In a Daily Mammal first, today’s mammal is not just a generic depiction of a species, but a portrait of a specific mammalian: my new niece Raecheleia Jonelle, who is exactly one week old tonight. Raecheleia is a human being, a species about which I think you already know. And a beautiful example she...

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Nocturnal Week: Northern Night Monkey (Douroucouli) (Aotus trivirgatus)
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Number 0049 Scientists once thought all night monkeys (also called owl monkeys, for fairly obvious reasons) were subspecies of this guy, the Northern variety, or douroucouli. But now they think there are actually eight distinct species, so I get to draw seven more of these guys! Perhaps I’ll do one every other year to space out the pleasure, because they are fun to draw....

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Nocturnal Week: Pygmy Mouse Lemur (Microcebus myoxinus)
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Number 0043 This pygmy mouse lemur inaugurates The Daily Mammal’s first-ever theme week! To celebrate my recent revelation that I’m actually not nocturnal, but rather a morning person who has difficulty waking up, I am pleased to introduce Nocturnal Week! The nocturnal pygmy mouse lemur is the world’s smallest primate. Andy requested this fellow. You will often see photographs of the little lemur in...

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Gorilla (Gorilla gorilla)
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Number 0037 This gorilla is for Andres, who loves King Kong! For the most part, the difference between monkeys and apes is that monkeys have tails and apes, like the gorillas and us, don’t. (If the title of this post, featuring the gorilla’s scientific name Gorilla gorilla, struck you as funny, you’ll like to know that there’s a subspecies—or maybe it’s a subtribe or...

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Northern Muriqui (Woolly Spider Monkey) (Brachyteles hypoxanthus)
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Number 0028 Ted requested a spider monkey, and then we had to narrow it down because there are several species. The muriquis used to be called woolly spider monkeys, but that name is out of favor now, and muriqui, the monkey’s Indian name, is in. Muriquis live only in Brazil. The northern species has a mottled pink-and-black face (as well as mottled pink-and-black genitals!),...

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Sumatran Orangutan (Pongo abelii)
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Number 0026 Until the 1990s, scientists thought there was only one species of orangutan, Pongo pygmaeus, with two subspecies, the Sumatran and Bornean orangutans. Well, DNA testing meant they could check to be sure, and what do you know? The Sumatran and Bornean orangutans turned out to be separate species. They’re pretty much indistinguishable unless you can inspect their genes, but I think the...

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Ring-tailed Lemur (Lemur catta)
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Number 0007 For Leigh’s last mammal, he branched out from western North America and requested a lemur. Apparently, there are 50 species of lemurs (many of which are endangered). I chose a ring-tailed lemur. Several websites about lemurs say that the word lemur comes from the Latin lemures, meaning “nocturnal spirits,” but my dictionary widget says it means “‘spirits of the dead’ (from its...

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