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Geoffroy Week: Geoffroy’s Marmoset (Callithrix geoffroyi)
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Number 0427 I’m unhappy with this marmoset drawing. The eyes are too far apart. But I had already spent a very long time working on a composition that showed the beautiful feathery tortoiseshell fur on the marmoset’s back, and it just didn’t work, and I had to finally just draw something, no matter how unsatisfactory, so here. (I blame the Lefty Frizzell I was...

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Javan Warty Pig (Sus verrucosus)
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Number 0423 The Javan warty pig is an endangered mammal that lives on the Indonesian island of Java. Its population is estimated to have decreased by more than 50 percent over three generations, which is only 18 years. The main threats to its livelihood are probably hunting and habitat loss. A German conservation group, ZGAP (which stands for Zoological Society for the Conservation of...

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Mammal Olympiad: Fencing: Mrs. Gray’s Lechwe (Kobus megaceros)
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Number 0418 Today’s Mammalympian is a fencer. Well, sort of. In human fencing, the object is to touch your opponent with your blade; your opponent uses his or her blade to keep you from doing that, while also trying to touch you. Some mammals carry their “blades” on their heads in the form of horns or antlers, and they’re more likely to attempt to...

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Mammal Olympiad: Marathon: Pronghorn (Antilocapra americana)
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The human Olympics start tonight on NBC, and the mammal Olympics start tonight here on the Daily Mammal! We’ll be looking at a few of the best mammalian athletes in the world. The first event is the marathon. Now, humans are pretty good at marathons. In fact, long-distance running is humans’ best sport. Slate had an article a couple of months ago whose subtitle...

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What I’ve Been Doing
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I’ve been wanting to write a post about the animals killed near Zanesville, Ohio, last week, but I’m not sure how to say everything I want to say. I did have the idea, though, to draw a tribute to the 49 unfortunate mammals who died, and I’ve been working on it the past several days, which is one reason why there hasn’t been a...

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Short-eared Brushtail Possum (Trichosurus caninus)
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Number 0396 I drew this fellow last week, and just now, sitting down to research him, I ended up tumbling about in my books and online, finding not a lot about the possum—he’s a marsupial who lives in a little-bitty sliver of eastern Australia—but several other bits and pieces somewhat related to the species, which is also known as the bobuck. For instance, as...

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Coyote (Canis latrans)
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Here’s an idea! Why don’t I point you to two embarrassingly bad old drawings in a row? I drew the coyote as mammal number 65, way back in 2007 (oh God, it’s been four years and I have barely a year’s worth of mammals…). Look how my drawing style has changed: very much for the better, yes? Looking over that post is bittersweet because...

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Five Random Rodents
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Numbers 0376, 0377, 0378, 0379 and 0380 Rodents keep me up at night. I can hear them scritch-scritch-scritching in the attic and the walls. Their whiskers lightly tickle my skin and their buck teeth gnaw on my bones. Their beady little eyes stare at me from every corner, glinting in the dark. Not because my house is infested—it isn’t—but because of the Daily Mammal...

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Hibernators Week: Chipmunks Six Ways (Tamias spp.)
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Numbers 0225, 0226, 0227, 0228, 0229, and 0230 In one sense, I got lazy with this drawing, doing it in sharpie on top of my pencil with no shading, no blending, no colored pencil, and it’s on my tracing paper sketch instead of a nice crisp sheet of vellum. No furry details, no crazy colors. But if you knew how long I researched it...

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Przewalski’s Horse (Equus przewalskii) and a vacation
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These tough little fellows from the Mongolian steppes are the only living example we have of a truly wild horse. (Other wild horses, such as the mustangs around these parts, are descended from domestic horses, and therefore not “truly” wild.) Unfortunately, Przewalski’s horse is extinct in the wild. In fact, we nearly lost the species altogether. In 1977, we were down to 300 of...

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Mammals of Iraq: Golden Jackal (Canis aureus)
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Number 0193 Golden jackals live not only in Iraq, but throughout northern Africa, Asia, and up into southern Europe. They mate for life, living in tight little family packs. They have one litter a year, and each time, a couple of their offspring stay on with their parents to help raise the next litter. These big brothers and sisters are called “helpers” and are...

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Mammals of Iraq: Caucasian Squirrel (Sciurus anomalus)
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  Number 0187 Sigh. It was so long ago that I started the Mammals of Iraq series. Then I decided to draw a jerboa…and it was really difficult…and I started putting it off…and forever passed. I decided to skip that particular jerboa species for now and just get on with it already. This squirrel, also known as the Persian squirrel, was the result. I...

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Happy birthday, Daily Mammal!
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Today, June 3, is the Daily Mammal’s first birthday! A few weeks ago, I posted a couple of goals I wanted to meet by today. And guess what! I met them! You wouldn’t know, though, because I have six drawings of mammals in six orders that have never previously been seen on this site, but I haven’t scanned and posted them yet. I hope...

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Mammalthon 2: Guereza (Colobus guereza)
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Number 0167 Last one! That was sure a looooong 24 hours, wasn’t it? My tía Laura let me pick for her, and I selected this black-and-white colobus monkey species, the guereza. It lives in Africa, and the white feathery fur you see off its shoulder here is called its mantle. It also has a very long tail, not shown here. This guy reminds me...

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Assorted mammalian musings
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• On June 3, 2007, the first Daily Mammal post went up. Almost a year ago! • I was up until 3:30 am last night working on a spreadsheet that lists the Latin names and taxonomic situations of all the mammals of the world. (Don’t worry, I didn’t make that part, I downloaded it from the Smithsonian.) What I was doing was putting in...

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CONTEST! Five Deer Mice: Aztec Mouse, California Mouse, Canyon Mouse, Gleaning Mouse, Hooper’s Deer Mouse
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Numbers 0137, 0138, 0139, 0140 and 0141 Those of you who have been following the Daily Mammal from the start know how daunting the rodents are. Nearly half of the 5,000 named mammal species are rodents, and as Ivan T. Sanderson says in Living Mammals of the World, “whole slews of these look almost exactly alike.” Not only are there are thousands and thousands...

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Extra mammal: Golden Lion Tamarin (Leontopithecus rosalia)
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  During the 24-Hour Mammalthon in December, or rather after it when I was catching up on my orders, I drew a golden lion tamarin for a boy named Tynan. Rebecca saw that drawing and loved it, and once I opened the Daily Mammal Original Art Shop, Rebecca requested a golden lion tamarin of her own! (You can request a mammal of your own,...

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Behind the Scenes: Daily Mammal Process Part 1
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I got a request for a post about my drawing process, and I’ve noticed that people are often surprised when they hear how I make my mammals, so I thought I’d give you a look into how I do what I do. This is part one of a two-part series. 1. Book research Every daily mammal starts with research. If I’m drawing a request,...

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Nocturnal Week: Spotted Cuscus (Spilocuscus maculatus)
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Number 0046 When I was a girl, I had a subscription to these wildlife cards. Once a month or so—maybe more often—I’d get a small pack of informational cards about animals. There was one species per card. On the front was a photograph of the animal, with its name and some symbols that indicated its class and family, its habitat, and such. On the...

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Ring-tailed Lemur (Lemur catta)
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Number 0007 For Leigh’s last mammal, he branched out from western North America and requested a lemur. Apparently, there are 50 species of lemurs (many of which are endangered). I chose a ring-tailed lemur. Several websites about lemurs say that the word lemur comes from the Latin lemures, meaning “nocturnal spirits,” but my dictionary widget says it means “‘spirits of the dead’ (from its...

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Wolverine (Gulo gulo)
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Number 0005 The wolverine is another request from Mr. Leigh, and it has a scientific name that’s very fun to say. It lives in Europe and Siberia, as well as in the northernmost parts of North America (and just barely down into the northwest U.S.). Just like me, the wolverine is solitary and needs a lot of space. I drew the wolverine several times...

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