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Brown-Throated Three-Toed Sloth (Bradypus variegatus)
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Number 0053 I didn’t know much about sloths, but my friend Laura requested one, and boy, I think they’re one of my favorite mammals now. I just love the way they look, like a cross between Chewbacca and E.T., and I love that they sleep 20 hours a day and hardly move even when they’re awake. I love their claws and their coarse fur....

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Nile Hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius)
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Number 0033 First, apologies for falling behind on the mammals! My Internet was down and I just started my new job this week, etc. I will be all caught up by tomorrow. In the meantime, please consider this a Thursday hippopotamus, and it’s for Sandra! More...

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Sugar Glider (Petaurus breviceps)
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Number 0020 I hadn’t heard of sugar gliders until Jeanne and Victoria told me about them last week. These nocturnal little guys—and they are little—live in Australia and New Guinea, where they glide from tree to tree. I think they look like they’re wearing capes. They are also fairly popular as exotic pets, but I don’t think I would want one, despite how adorable...

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(Baby) Asian Elephant (Elephas maximus)
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Number 0018 This one is for Raecheleia! Asian elephants, also called Indian elephants, are smaller than the African ones, with smaller ears, too, and they’re easier to train, so they are frequently used as beasts of burden. They are endangered in the wild. This one’s a baby with fur on his head and wrinkles all over. I’m moving across the country in about six...

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Short-beaked Echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus)
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Number 0017 May I introduce the monotremes? They are an ancient order of mammals, now including only the duck-billed platypus and a few species of echidna. Monotremes are very strange creatures, mammals that lay eggs and nurse their young (which are called puggles!) after they hatch, although they don’t have teats and instead secrete milk from their pores! This one, the short-beaked echidna, is...

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Jack Rabbit (Lepus californicus)
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Number 0014 Maleta also wanted a rabbit, but instead, she’s getting a hare! Several varieties of jack rabbits live in western North America, but they’re not really rabbits. Hares are different because their babies (called leverets) are born with fur and open eyes, while baby rabbits (or kits) are born hairless with their eyes closed. Also, rabbits make nests in which to give birth,...

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