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Mammalthon 2: Yellow-Bellied Marmot (Marmota flaviventris)
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Number 0152 This is another one for my dad. Yellow-bellied marmots live in rocky, mountainous areas of western North America. They live in burrows where a male marmot has a “harem” of two or three females. In a nice change from the usual, yellow-bellied marmots are common throughout their range and not endangered. Yay yellow-bellied marmots! Yellow-bellied Marmot Alarm Call Fact Sheet —————- Now...

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Mammalthon 2: Texas Longhorn (Bos taurus)
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Number 0151 The Texas longhorn, which is a breed of the domestic cow, is a pretty special American animal. It’s descended from the first cattle that were brought to North America (by the Spanish), and it’s the only breed of cow to evolve on its own, without human direction. Rangy and lean, longhorns can survive in extremely harsh environments. While they once roamed the...

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Mammalthon 2: Black Lemur (Eulemur macaco)
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Number 0150 Here’s a portrait of me and Ted! Maybe not, but Ted did request a black lemur. He was inspired by this fantastic photograph by Joel Sartore. Like all lemurs, the black lemur is native to Madagascar. That means they’re Malagasy! The female, on the left here, looks a lot different from the male, as you can plainly see. Also, there are two...

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Mammalthon 2: White-Winged Vampire Bat (Diaemus youngi)
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Number 0149 Good thing I drew this so early, while it’s still light out, or we’d all be too scared to continue! It looks like this guy is in Joe’s bedroom, getting ready to bite while Joe sleeps peacefully. Luckily for Joe, however, white-winged vampire bats get the blood they drink mostly from birds. When the white-winged vampire bat spots a likely target—perhaps an...

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Mammalthon 2: Steller Sea Lion (Eumetopias jubatus)
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Kate, the mother of my dear friend Sarah (who should be graduating with her MFA any day now—congratulations, Sarah!), requested a Steller sea lion. The largest of all sea lions, Steller sea lions live along the northern Pacific rim. They’re carnivorous, and according to National Geographic’s website, they have been known to eat smaller seals. I also learned from that page that in the...

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Mammalthon 2: Snow Leopard (Uncia uncia)
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Number 0148 Here’s the first of several mammals requested by my dad for this second 24-Hour Mammal Marathon. A nice start, this furry and beautiful animal, don’t you think? Snow leopards live in the mountains of central Asia and are very endangered. They’re hunted for their coats, used in traditional Asian medicines, and killed when they prey on livestock. Then there’s the ubiquitous habitat...

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Let the Wild Rumpus Start!
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Mammalthon 2 starts NOW! We’ve got 24 actual scientifically proven mammals, one perhaps mythical mammal, and one bird. (That one was the last request to make it in. Why not, right?) Let’s see how far we get! —————- Now playing: Merle Haggard – (My Friends Are Gonna Be) Strangers via...

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24 MAMMALS IN 24 HOURS: Mammalthon 2 is coming April 19!
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    Last December, 36 beautiful, generous, animal-loving art aficionados participated in the first Daily Mammal 24-Hour Mammal Marathon. I stayed up for 24 hours straight and drew a mammal an hour (almost). People who donated to Defenders of Wildlife got to request a mammal, see it appear during the 24-hour mammalthon, and then receive the original drawing in the mail. It was unbelievably...

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Back Orders: Arctic Fox (Alopex lagopus)
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Number 0106 The Arctic fox is Nicola’s favorite mammal, so this one is for her. My own favorite thing about the Arctic fox is that it is Iceland’s only native land mammal; all the other terrestrial mammals there were brought by humans. Arctic foxes’ coats are generally white in the winter and a lovely gray or gray-and-white in the summer, although this also seems...

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Back Orders: Golden Lion Tamarin (Leontopithecus rosalia)
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Number 0105 Tynan requested a golden lion tamarin, which is a small monkey that lives in the rain forest in eastern Brazil. It’s extremely endangered—only 1,000–1,500 survive in the wild—mainly because of industrialization and cultivation of its forest habitat. Golden lion tamarins are omnivorous, eating insects, lizards, and fruit. I wonder why they’re so beautifully tangerine-colored. Golden Lion Tamarin Conservation Program (National Zoo) Golden...

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Back Orders: Sea Otter (Enhydra lutris)
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Number 0103 Here is a funny fellow for Joanna. Sea otters, which live in the coastal waters of the Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea, have the thickest fur of any mammal. That’s because unlike other aquatic mammals, sea otters don’t have blubber and rely on their fur to insulate them. They spend most of their time on their backs. As Ivan T. Sanderson says,...

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Back Orders: Brown-throated Three-toed Sloth (Bradypus variegatus)
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About the three-toed sloth, which he insists on calling the three-FINGERED sloth, Sanderson says, “Aggravatingly and quite erroneously, they have been called the two-toed and three-toed, when both have five toes. However, one, the Unau, has only two fingers, and the other, the Ai, has three fingers.” But as far as I can tell, he’s wrong! Animal Diversity Web says all sloths have three...

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Back Orders: Fossa (Cryptoprocta forex)
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Number 0102 Jennifer’s stuck on a bus, so I’m posting this one for her. No, really, she is. This one was requested by Russell. This little cat-like carnivore is endemic to Madagascar. It spends most of its time sleeping, which is why Jennifer didn’t draw its amazing brown eyes. Now she wishes she had. But I like this little tyke just the way she...

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Back Orders: Arctic Wolf (Canis lupus arctos)
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The arctic wolf, which Nancy requested, is a subspecies of the gray wolf. It’s a little smaller with a shorter nose and ears and a white coat year-round. The arctic wolf is very isolated in the northernmost parts of North America and in Greenland, and the World Wildlife Foundation tells me that it’s the only wolf subspecies that isn’t threatened, which is good news...

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Back Orders: (New Zealand) Brush-tailed Possum (Trichosurus vulpecula)
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Number 0101 Sure, he’s cute, but don’t get too attached. The New Zealand brush-tailed possum (requested by Lauri) is a tragic figure indeed, and it’s best if we can desensitize ourselves a bit. Introduced to New Zealand in the 19th century in order to start a fur trade that didn’t survive into the 20th century, the possums now form an overwhelmingly rampant crew of...

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Back Orders: Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus)
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Number 0100 My brother-in-law Stephen is a runner. I think that’s why he requested a cheetah. In a sprinting contest, though, Stephen would stand no chance: the fastest human sprinters hit about 20 miles per hour, while the cheetah goes at about 65–70. The cheetah, however, cannot go nearly as fast as the peregrine falcon, which is the fastest animal on earth. Diving in...

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Back Orders: Fennec Fox (Vulpes zerda)
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This fennec fox is for Kelsey, who used to be an absurdly adorable and entertaining young boy, but is now unaccountably a suave and self-possessed teenager. The fennec is his favorite animal at the zoo. I drew one a while back, but I never did like my drawing, so I’m glad I got the chance to redo...

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Back orders: Black Howler Monkey (Alouatta pigra)
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Number 0099 This female black howler monkey is for Nicole, who let me choose for her. Why did I choose a female black howler monkey? Well, if you knew Nicole, you wouldn’t ask! Just kidding! Howler monkeys live in the South and Central American rain forests. They are the loudest land animal in the world. (Loudest animal, period, is the blue whale.) You can...

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24 Hours: Progress Report: SHE DID IT!
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Jennifer Atkins did it: She drew 24 mammals non-stop! It took her just over 26 hours, and she didn’t give up until the 24 mammals promised were completed! Here are pictures of our illustrator working on her final drawing of the marathon: the large flying fox for me. Compare these photos with how she looked at the start — she’s still fresh as a...

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WE DID IT!
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WE DID IT!

Dec 23, 2007 by

Wow! Twenty-four mammals in…twenty-six hours! We actually did it! Thank you to everyone who contributed a donation, requested a mammal, or posted a comment. Your support got me through this mammalian marathon, and I really appreciate everyone’s encouragement. I’m so happy that people cared and took an interest and wanted to help Defenders of Wildlife! So THANK YOU. I’ll be back…maybe not today…to draw...

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Large Flying Fox (Pteropus vampyrus)
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Number 0098 For Ted, a Large Flying Fox! These are really huge bats, with wingspans up to 6′! I had to draw two of them because I couldn’t decide whether to highlight its size in flight or its beautiful face. And it’s the last of the 24 mammals, which is actually making me a little sad! I have two questions for any bat experts...

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24 Hours: North American Porcupine (and who’s left?)
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Number 0097 Here’s a rather wild-looking porcupine for Bradley. At first, I was very frustrated with how I was drawing it, but it ended up being a crazy color extravaganza. I’m trying to think whether I’ve seen a porcupine in person, and I don’t think I have. Okay, now we have but one mammal left to make 24! But several other people have made...

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24 Hours: Kinkajou
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24 Hours: Kinkajou

Dec 23, 2007 by

Number 0095 This is another case where the donor asked me to choose a mammal. For my tia Laura, I chose the kinkajou, a panda/raccoon relative. I know I was supposed to cut down on research and commentary, but I remember reading a book when I was a kid about a family that had a pet kinkajou (among other exotic pets). I think it...

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24 Hours: Woolly Mammoth (Extinctus gargantuus)
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Now, don’t go getting any ideas from John’s woolly mammoth request. This is a special occasion, but I don’t have time to draw every mammal that ever lived! No saber-toothed tigers, no mastodons…maybe a thylacine, but that’s it. —————- Now playing: Jose Gonzalez – Crosses via...

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24 Hours: Elk (Wapiti)
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Number 0094 This is for Maleta. She gave me my choice, and I choose an elk! I know Maleta likes animals that can be found in New Mexico, and this is one. —————- Now playing: Explosions In The Sky – Welcome, Ghosts via...

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24 Hours: Gerenuk (Who knows?)
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Number 0092 Joe said “Pick something obscure that you think would be fun to draw,” so here, Joe, is your gerenuk, also called the giraffe-necked antelope! He was indeed fun to draw. If you want to see some really strange and beautiful creatures, look for photos of the gerenuk. —————- Now playing: Teddy Pendergrass – Love TKO via...

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