Navigation Menu+
Random Week: Gregarious Short-tailed Rat (Brachyuromys ramirohitra)
Read more

Number 0383 This week, I’m drawing mammals selected randomly by random.org. Each day, it’s a surprise to me, and this should be a good way to get through some of the mammals that I would be unlikely to choose on my own…like this one, the gregarious short-tailed rat. Nothing against him, but there’s very little information available about him and very few photographs for...

Read more
Random Week: Inland Forest Bat (Vespadelus baverstocki)
Read more

Number 0382 I had fun with the random rodents I drew the other day, so I’ve decided on a new theme week: Random Week! I put all the mammals I haven’t yet drawn in random.org’s list randomizer and for the next week-ish, I’ll be as surprised as you by what mammal I draw each day. (I only put in their genus and species names,...

Read more
Golden Snub-Nosed Monkey (Rhinopithecus roxellana)
Read more

Number 0381 Golden snub-nosed monkeys live in central China, with the majority making their homes in the Sichuan province. They roam through mountain forests where snow covers the ground for half the year, eating lichens and other ploants and the occasional insect. They are endangered, and the IUCN tells us that the major threats to their continued existence are habitat loss and tourism-related activities....

Read more
Five Random Rodents
Read more

Numbers 0376, 0377, 0378, 0379 and 0380 Rodents keep me up at night. I can hear them scritch-scritch-scritching in the attic and the walls. Their whiskers lightly tickle my skin and their buck teeth gnaw on my bones. Their beady little eyes stare at me from every corner, glinting in the dark. Not because my house is infested—it isn’t—but because of the Daily Mammal...

Read more
Tibetan Fox (Vulpes ferrilata)
Read more

Number 0375 By request! A Tibetan sand fox, which is also known as a Tibetan fox or as a sand fox. These foxes live on the Tibetan Plateau in India, China, Nepal, and Tibet. The Tibetan Plateau is both the largest and the highest plateau in the world, and I know from Coco’s school report on Tibet this year that it’s called the roof...

Read more
Thank you for a successful Mammalthon!
Read more

Hi Mammals, The fundraiser for the mammals of Japan is over, and I’m proud to say we raised $465.00. I’ve already donated half of it (in Japanese yen!) to Animal Refuge Kansai, and I’ll donate the rest to the American Red Cross when the transfer clears. Thank you again for supporting our work and the people and animals of Japan. Love, Jennifer and...

Read more
Japan Benefit: タヌキ (Raccoon Dog) (Nyctereutes procyonoides)
Read more

Today is the final day of our fundraising effort to help Japan. These two drawings, along with the few that remain from earlier in the week, are for sale, with their entire purchase price going to help people and animals affected by the earthquake and tsunami in March—half to the American Red Cross, half to Animal Refuge Kansai, an animal shelter in Japan. Please...

Read more
Japan Benefit: イリオモテヤマネコ (Iriomote Cat) (Prionailurus iriomotensis)
Read more

All week, my daughter Coco and I are selling our drawings of Japanese mammals to raise funds for Japan! If you buy one of them, whether matted or unmatted, your entire purchase price will go to help those affected by the earthquake and tsunami: half to the American Red Cross, half to Animal Refuge Kansai, a Japanese animal shelter taking in homeless pets. Please...

Read more
Japan Benefit: ニホンザル (Japanese Macaque) (Macaca fuscata)
Read more

This week’s drawings, by me and by Coco, are for sale to benefit animals and people affected by the earthquake and tsunami in Japan! If you buy a drawing, we’ll give half of the purchase price to the American Red Cross and half to Animal Refuge Kansai, an animal shelter in Japan. You can select a matted drawing or leave it unmatted. Unmatted, they’re...

Read more
Japan Benefit: テン (Japanese Marten) (Martes melampus)
Read more

This week we’re selling our drawings to benefit Japan! You can buy an original drawing by me or by my daughter Coco, we can mat it for you or leave it as-is, and the best part is that not only do you get a unique work of art, you also get to help people and animals affected by the tsunami and earthquake of earlier...

Read more
Japan Benefit: ニホンリス (Japanese Squirrel) (Sciurus lis)
Read more

This week we’re raising money for people and animals in Japan, and you can help! More details in just a moment… Number 0370 The Japanese squirrel is endemic to Japan, where it is called Nihon risu. It has a red coat in the summer and a grayish-brown one in the fall. This particular fellow looks like he’s getting ready for summer! He’d love to...

Read more
African Buffalo (Syncerus caffer)
Read more

There certainly is a fierce beast to meet today, but don’t forget that tomorrow is the beginning of the Japan Mammalthon, and Coco and I will be posting original drawings that you can buy, with all proceeds benefiting victims of the tsunamis and earthquakes. Read this post for all the details. Number 0368 “…[I]t has an unpleasant habit of remaining quietly in its lair...

Read more
Goodfellow’s Tree Kangaroo (Dendrolagus goodfellowi)
Read more

I’m eager to introduce you to an enchanting tree kangaroo, but first let me remind you that starting Sunday, Coco and I will be selling original drawings of the mammals of Japan with all proceeds helping victims of the earthquakes and tsunamis. See yesterday’s post for the details!   Number 0367 I have fallen in love with tree kangaroos. They are my new favorite...

Read more
Tehuantepec Jackrabbit (Lepis flavigularis)
Read more

Before we meet a long-eared jackrabbit from Mexico, an announcement: Like everyone, my daughter Coco and I have been saddened by the earthquakes and tsunamis in Japan this month. We’ve decided to have a Daily Mammal fundraiser to raise some money to help people and animals affected by the disasters. Next week, beginning Sunday and running through Saturday, the two of us will post...

Read more
Two Beautiful Squirrels (Callosciurus prevostii, C. finlaysonii)
Read more

Numbers 0364 and 0365 Well, mammals, we made it! Mammal Number 365 is here, with his buddy Number 364, ready to meet you and celebrate a year’s worth of Daily Mammals, completed on average once every four days, which doesn’t sound too bad, until you do the math and realize that at that rate, it will take me an additional 52 years to draw...

Read more
Bushy-tailed Olingo (Bassaricyon gabbii)
Read more

Number 0363 Sadly, my long mammal-posting streak was broken yesterday…because I jumped off a rock and broke my calcaneus, the big bone at the bottom of the heel. It hurts like mad! But while I recuperate, I will try to keep up the mammaling. Today’s mammal is the bushy-tailed olingo, which lives in Costa Rica, Panama, Nicaragua, Ecuador, and Colombia. It is a procyonid,...

Read more
Muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus)
Read more

Number 0362 I was going to give you an MP3 of “Muskrat Love,” either the Captain & Tennille or the America version, but that song is just so bad that I couldn’t stand to do it. So instead, I will direct you to the Everything Muskrat website, an impressively comprehensive compendium of, indeed, everything muskrat, and to a 2008 article from the Washington Post...

Read more
Blackbuck (Antilope cervicapra)
Read more

Number 0361 I do love seeing that mammal counter inching toward 365! Say good afternoon to the blackbuck, an antelope native to India, Bangladesh, Nepal, and Pakistan, but now extinct everywhere but India—and Argentina, Australia, and Texas, where it has been introduced. I’ll try to tell you what I’ve learned about the blackbuck roughly in the order of my learning about it: 1. According...

Read more
Horsfield’s Tarsier (Tarsius bancanus)
Read more

Number 0360 I know we just met the greater slow loris the other day, but here is another fuzzy fellow with huge, unmoving eyes and a neck that swivels 180 degrees. Horsfield’s tarsier lives in Brunei, Indonesia, and Malaysia, where he climbs in the trees and forages on the ground, looking for insects like cicadas, moths, stick bugs, and cockroaches, as well as bats,...

Read more
Oncilla (Leopardus tigrinus)
Read more

Number 0359 Today marks two straight weeks of mammals! How do you like them apples? Also, if you look to the right at today’s mammal’s number, you will see that sometime next week, if we continue on this track, we will complete a year’s worth of “daily” mammals! And it will have taken us less than four years… Moving right along, my mom requested...

Read more
Bactrian Camel (Camelus bactrianus)
Read more

Number 0358 The Bactrian camel is the one with two humps. The Arabian camel or dromedary has only one hump. You can remember that by imagining the capital initials of their names turned on their side: B for Bactrian has two humps, and D for dromedary has one. (I didn’t come up with that, I read it on Ultimate Ungulate.) Then again, maybe you...

Read more
Greater Slow Loris (Nycticebus coucang)
Read more

Number 0357 Now, this is an interesting little primate. The greater slow loris (there are a few other kinds of lorises, as well) lives in Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand. It’s nocturnal and its eyes don’t move—it has to turn its head to look around. It’s very solitary, crawling around in the trees, eating sap and fruit and snails and eggs. Inside each of...

Read more
Repeat: Common Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes)
Read more

Until February 24, 2011, I hadn’t posted a mammal since July 10, 2010. Why? Well, the kids kept me busy, and that’s an understatement. Most of it was just general exhaustion. But I was also a bit burned out after my World Cup series, a month-long extravaganza of mammals that involved a whole lot of research about soccer and different countries in addition to...

Read more
Mating Week: Saddleback Tamarin (Saguinus fuscicollis)
Read more

Number 0356 I’ve decided to go ahead and call this an official theme week. This is the fifth and last entry in our Daily Mammal Mating Week. The saddleback tamarin, which lives in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru, practices polyandry, which means that a single female mates with more than one male. (Polygamy technically refers to a marriage or partnership with more than...

Read more
Mating Week: Brown Antechinus (Antechinus stuartii)
Read more

Number 0355 Every female wants a good father for her babies. Every male wants a good mother for his babies. That’s what life is all about. The more I study other animals, the more I think the meaning of life is: have sex and have babies, and have sex and babies with a mate or mates of good quality. Is there any other reason...

Read more
Mating Week: Gambian Epauletted Bat (Epomophorus gambianus)
Read more

Number 0354 Last June, I drew the hammer-headed fruit bat, which is known for its lek mating system. The Gambian epauletted bat, today’s mammal, uses a similar lek system. In Courtship in the Animal Kingdom, Mark Jerome Walters explains leks: In some animals, however, males offer neither defense of the females nor any particular resource. There is no trade-off of riches, nor any guarantee...

Read more
Mating Week: Northern Elephant Seal (Mirounga angustirostris)
Read more

Number 0353 There’s so much to say about elephant seals, and yet it’s so distasteful. These guys are rapists and baby-killers. Their necks are discolored by scars incurred during mating or fighting for mates, and one of my books, Wonders of Animal Life from 1928, lists “Sea elephants, frightfulness” in its index. In Living Mammals of the World, Ivan T. Sanderson says that they...

Read more
Mating Week: Klipspringer (Oreotragus oreotragus)
Read more

Number 0352 The klipspringer is a little-bitty antelope that lives in eastern and southern Africa on rocky cliffs. I originally picked it for my planned Mammal Mating theme week because it is a rare example of a monogamous mammal. (Most birds are monogamous; most mammals are not.) And what’s interesting is why it’s monogamous. And I also find it interesting that we humans—just apes,...

Read more
Wrinkle-faced Bat (Centurio senex)
Read more

Number 0351 When I drew this guy, I was working on a Mammal Mating theme week, but that was several months ago, and now I can’t figure out what’s interesting about the wrinkle-faced bat’s mating habits, except that scientists speculate that the wrinkled face may be related to sexual selection. Only the males have big neck flaps, and they emit a musky odor from...

Read more